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Cost-effectiveness of emergency versus delayed laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute gallbladder pathology

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Surgery, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
117 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
135 Mendeley
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Title
Cost-effectiveness of emergency versus delayed laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute gallbladder pathology
Published in
British Journal of Surgery, October 2016
DOI 10.1002/bjs.10317
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. J. Sutton, R. S. Vohra, M. Hollyman, P. J. Marriott, A. Buja, D. Alderson, S. Pasquali, E. A. Griffiths

Abstract

The optimal timing of cholecystectomy for patients admitted with acute gallbladder pathology is unclear. Some studies have shown that emergency cholecystectomy during the index admission can reduce length of hospital stay with similar rates of conversion to open surgery, complications and mortality compared with a 'delayed' operation following discharge. Others have reported that cholecystectomy during the index acute admission results in higher morbidity, extended length of stay and increased costs. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of emergency versus delayed cholecystectomy for acute benign gallbladder disease. Using data from a prospective population-based cohort study examining the outcomes of cholecystectomy in the UK and Ireland, a model-based cost-utility analysis was conducted from the perspective of the UK National Health Service, with a 1-year time horizon for costs and outcomes. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to investigate the impact of parameter uncertainty on the results obtained from the model. Emergency cholecystectomy was found to be less costly (£4570 versus £4720; €5484 versus €5664) and more effective (0·8868 versus 0·8662 QALYs) than delayed cholecystectomy. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the emergency strategy is more than 60 per cent likely to be cost-effective across willingness-to-pay values for the QALY from £0 to £100 000 (€0-120 000). Emergency cholecystectomy is less costly and more effective than delayed cholecystectomy. This approach is likely to be beneficial to patients in terms of improved health outcomes and to the healthcare provider owing to the reduced costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 117 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 134 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 28 21%
Researcher 15 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 10%
Student > Postgraduate 10 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 6%
Other 32 24%
Unknown 28 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 78 58%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 1%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 <1%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 46 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 78. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2020.
All research outputs
#280,084
of 15,781,576 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Surgery
#103
of 3,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,864
of 296,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Surgery
#4
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,781,576 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,909 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.