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Why social values cannot be changed for the sake of conservation

Overview of attention for article published in Conservation Biology, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
154 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
113 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
602 Mendeley
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Title
Why social values cannot be changed for the sake of conservation
Published in
Conservation Biology, February 2017
DOI 10.1111/cobi.12855
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael J. Manfredo, Jeremy T. Bruskotter, Tara L. Teel, David Fulton, Shalom H. Schwartz, Robert Arlinghaus, Shigehiro Oishi, Ayse K. Uskul, Kent Redford, Shinobu Kitayama, Leeann Sullivan

Abstract

The hope for creating widespread change in social values has endured among conservation professionals since early calls by Aldo Leopold for a "Land Ethic". However, there has been little serious attention in conservation to the fields of investigation that address values, how they are formed, and how they change. We introduce a social-ecological systems approach in which values are seen not just as motivational goals that people hold, but they are also deeply embedded in the world around us, in our material culture, collective behaviors, traditions, and social institutions. They are important concepts that define and bind groups, organizations, and societies. Values have emerged to serve an adaptive role and are typically stable across generations. When abrupt change does occur, it is in response to substantial alterations in the social-ecological context. Change builds upon prior value structures and does not result in complete replacement. Given this understanding of values, we conclude that deliberate efforts to orchestrate value shift for conservation are unlikely to be effective. Instead, there is an urgent need for research on values with a multi-level and dynamic view that can inform innovative conservation strategies for working within existing value structures. This paper identifies key questions that will enhance our understanding of the role that values play in shaping conservation challenges and improve our ability to manage the human component of conservation practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 154 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 602 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 589 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 153 25%
Researcher 106 18%
Student > Master 106 18%
Student > Bachelor 42 7%
Other 34 6%
Other 95 16%
Unknown 66 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 209 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 138 23%
Social Sciences 66 11%
Psychology 27 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 2%
Other 58 10%
Unknown 92 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2019.
All research outputs
#206,931
of 15,886,556 outputs
Outputs from Conservation Biology
#125
of 3,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,324
of 296,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Conservation Biology
#4
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,886,556 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,122 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,100 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.