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Axonal Fiber Terminations Concentrate on Gyri

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebral Cortex, December 2011
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Mentioned by

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1 Google+ user

Citations

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62 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Axonal Fiber Terminations Concentrate on Gyri
Published in
Cerebral Cortex, December 2011
DOI 10.1093/cercor/bhr361
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jingxin Nie, Lei Guo, Kaiming Li, Yonghua Wang, Guojun Chen, Longchuan Li, Hanbo Chen, Fan Deng, Xi Jiang, Tuo Zhang, Ling Huang, Carlos Faraco, Degang Zhang, Cong Guo, Pew-Thian Yap, Xintao Hu, Gang Li, Jinglei Lv, Yixuan Yuan, Dajiang Zhu, Junwei Han, Dean Sabatinelli, Qun Zhao, L. Stephen Miller, Bingqian Xu, Ping Shen, Simon Platt, Dinggang Shen, Xiaoping Hu, Tianming Liu

Abstract

Convoluted cortical folding and neuronal wiring are 2 prominent attributes of the mammalian brain. However, the macroscale intrinsic relationship between these 2 general cross-species attributes, as well as the underlying principles that sculpt the architecture of the cerebral cortex, remains unclear. Here, we show that the axonal fibers connected to gyri are significantly denser than those connected to sulci. In human, chimpanzee, and macaque brains, a dominant fraction of axonal fibers were found to be connected to the gyri. This finding has been replicated in a range of mammalian brains via diffusion tensor imaging and high-angular resolution diffusion imaging. These results may have shed some lights on fundamental mechanisms for development and organization of the cerebral cortex, suggesting that axonal pushing is a mechanism of cortical folding.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Netherlands 2 3%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Cuba 1 1%
Unknown 61 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 26%
Student > Master 8 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 22%
Neuroscience 11 16%
Unspecified 10 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Engineering 8 12%
Other 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2012.
All research outputs
#7,517,891
of 12,023,873 outputs
Outputs from Cerebral Cortex
#2,206
of 3,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,508
of 133,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebral Cortex
#34
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,023,873 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,050 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.