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Cortical-amygdalar circuit dysfunction in a genetic mouse model of serotonin deficiency.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
13 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Cortical-amygdalar circuit dysfunction in a genetic mouse model of serotonin deficiency.
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, March 2013
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.4891-12.2013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dzirasa K, Kumar S, Sachs BD, Caron MG, Nicolelis MA, K. Dzirasa, S. Kumar, B. D. Sachs, M. G. Caron, M. A. L. Nicolelis

Abstract

Although the majority of first-line antidepressants increase brain serotonin and rare polymorphisms in tryptophan hydroxlase-2 (Tph2), the rate-limiting enzyme in the brain serotonin synthesis pathway, have been identified in cohorts of subjects with major depressive disorder, the circuit level alterations that results from serotonergic hypofunction remain poorly understood. Here we use chronic multicircuit neurophysiological recordings to characterize functional interactions across cortical and limbic circuits in mice engineered to express a human loss-of-function depression allele Tph2-(R441H) [Tph2 knockin (Tph2KI)]. Our results show that Tph2KI mice exhibit increased intra-network synchrony within medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and basal amygdala (AMY) and increased inter-network synchrony between these two brain networks. Moreover, we demonstrate that chronic treatment with fluoxetine reverses several of the circuit alterations observed within Tph2KI mice. Together, our findings establish a functional link between functional hyposerotonergia and altered mPFC-AMY network dynamics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 9%
United Kingdom 2 2%
France 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 78 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 26%
Student > Master 8 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Other 6 7%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 6 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 30%
Neuroscience 27 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 14%
Engineering 6 7%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 10 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2013.
All research outputs
#2,400,704
of 15,569,733 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#4,858
of 20,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,584
of 152,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#110
of 403 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,569,733 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 20,059 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 152,139 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 403 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.