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Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Ecology, October 2012
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Title
Deep Sequencing of Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila, an Epibiotic Sponge on Cold-Seep Tubeworms, Reveals Methylotrophic, Thiotrophic, and Putative Hydrocarbon-Degrading Microbial Associations
Published in
Microbial Ecology, October 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00248-012-0130-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shawn M. Arellano, On On Lee, Feras F. Lafi, Jiangke Yang, Yong Wang, Craig M. Young, Pei-Yuan Qian

Abstract

The encrusting sponge Myxilla (Ectyomyxilla) methanophila (Poecilosclerida: Myxillidae) is an epibiont on vestimentiferan tubeworms at hydrocarbon seeps on the upper Louisiana slope of the Gulf of Mexico. It has long been suggested that this sponge harbors methylotrophic bacteria due to its low δ(13)C value and high methanol dehydrogenase activity, yet the full community of microbial associations in M. methanophila remained uncharacterized. In this study, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes representing the microbial community in M. methanophila collected from two hydrocarbon-seep sites (GC234 and Bush Hill) using both Sanger sequencing and next-generation 454 pyrosequencing technologies. Additionally, we compared the microbial community in M. methanophila to that of the biofilm collected from the associated tubeworm. Our results revealed that the microbial diversity in the sponges from both sites was low but the community structure was largely similar, showing a high proportion of methylotrophic bacteria of the genus Methylohalomonas and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria of the genera Cycloclasticus and Neptunomonas. Furthermore, the sponge microbial clone library revealed the dominance of thioautotrophic gammaproteobacterial symbionts in M. methanophila. In contrast, the biofilm communities on the tubeworms were more diverse and dominated by the chemoorganotrophic Moritella at GC234 and methylotrophic Methylomonas and Methylohalomonas at Bush Hill. Overall, our study provides evidence to support previous suggestion that M. methanophila harbors methylotrophic symbionts and also reveals the association of PAH-degrading and thioautotrophic microbes in the sponge.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
Mexico 1 2%
Chile 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 43 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 26%
Student > Master 6 12%
Unspecified 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 64%
Unspecified 5 10%
Environmental Science 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2013.
All research outputs
#2,693,776
of 3,627,884 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Ecology
#240
of 318 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58,453
of 85,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Ecology
#9
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,627,884 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 318 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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