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Impact of insufficient sleep on total daily energy expenditure, food intake, and weight gain

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
41 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
977 tweeters
facebook
30 Facebook pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
281 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Impact of insufficient sleep on total daily energy expenditure, food intake, and weight gain
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1216951110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel R. Markwald, Edward L. Melanson, Mark R. Smith, Janine Higgins, Leigh Perreault, Robert H. Eckel, Kenneth P. Wright, Jr, Kenneth P. Wright, Jr., Markwald, Rachel R, Melanson, Edward L, Smith, Mark R, Higgins, Janine, Perreault, Leigh, Eckel, Robert H, Wright, Kenneth P, R. R. Markwald, E. L. Melanson, M. R. Smith, J. Higgins, L. Perreault, R. H. Eckel, K. P. Wright

Abstract

Insufficient sleep is associated with obesity, yet little is known about how repeated nights of insufficient sleep influence energy expenditure and balance. We studied 16 adults in a 14- to 15-d-long inpatient study and quantified effects of 5 d of insufficient sleep, equivalent to a work week, on energy expenditure and energy intake compared with adequate sleep. We found that insufficient sleep increased total daily energy expenditure by ∼5%; however, energy intake--especially at night after dinner--was in excess of energy needed to maintain energy balance. Insufficient sleep led to 0.82 ± 0.47 kg (±SD) weight gain despite changes in hunger and satiety hormones ghrelin and leptin, and peptide YY, which signaled excess energy stores. Insufficient sleep delayed circadian melatonin phase and also led to an earlier circadian phase of wake time. Sex differences showed women, not men, maintained weight during adequate sleep, whereas insufficient sleep reduced dietary restraint and led to weight gain in women. Our findings suggest that increased food intake during insufficient sleep is a physiological adaptation to provide energy needed to sustain additional wakefulness; yet when food is easily accessible, intake surpasses that needed. We also found that transitioning from an insufficient to adequate/recovery sleep schedule decreased energy intake, especially of fats and carbohydrates, and led to -0.03 ± 0.50 kg weight loss. These findings provide evidence that sleep plays a key role in energy metabolism. Importantly, they demonstrate physiological and behavioral mechanisms by which insufficient sleep may contribute to overweight and obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 977 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Croatia 2 2%
Japan 2 2%
Denmark 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
China 1 1%
Unknown 81 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 19%
Student > Bachelor 16 18%
Researcher 15 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Other 7 8%
Other 22 25%
Unknown 1 1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 22%
Psychology 10 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 8%
Other 23 26%
Unknown 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 758. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2018.
All research outputs
#5,269
of 11,799,015 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#203
of 75,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45
of 132,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#4
of 989 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,799,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 75,741 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 132,287 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 989 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.