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Parenting and childhood atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study of relationships between parenting behaviour, skin care management, and disease severity in young children

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Nursing Studies, December 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Parenting and childhood atopic dermatitis: A cross-sectional study of relationships between parenting behaviour, skin care management, and disease severity in young children
Published in
International Journal of Nursing Studies, December 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2016.09.016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy E. Mitchell, Jennifer A. Fraser, Alina Morawska, Joanne Ramsbotham, Patsy Yates

Abstract

The development of child behaviour and parenting difficulties is understood to undermine treatment outcomes for children with atopic dermatitis. Past research has reported on correlates of child behaviour difficulties. However, few research studies have sought to examine parenting confidence and practices in this clinical group. To examine relationships between child, parent, and family variables, parent-reported and directly-observed child and parent behaviour, parents' self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour, self-reported parenting strategies, and disease severity. Cross-sectional study design. Parent-child dyads (N=64) were recruited from the dermatology clinic of a paediatric tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Children had a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis of ≥3months and no other chronic health conditions except asthma, allergic rhinitis, or allergy. Parents completed self-report measures assessing child behaviour; parent depression, anxiety, and stress; parenting conflict and relationship satisfaction; self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour, and use of ineffective parenting strategies; and self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis, and performance of atopic dermatitis management tasks. The Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index was used to assess disease severity. Routine at-home treatment sessions were coded for parent and child behaviour. Pearson's and Spearman's correlations identified relationships (p<0.05) between self-efficacy with managing difficult child behaviour and child behaviour problems, parent depression and stress, parenting conflict and relationship satisfaction, and household income. There were also relationships between each of these variables and use of ineffective parenting strategies. Greater use of ineffective parenting strategies was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis. Using multiple linear regressions, child behaviour and household income explained unique variance in self-efficacy for managing difficult child behaviour; household income alone explained unique variance in use of ineffective parenting strategies. Self-efficacy for managing difficult child behaviour and self-efficacy for managing atopic dermatitis were positively correlated (rho=0.48, p<0.001), and more successful self-reported performance of atopic dermatitis management tasks correlated with less permissive (r=0.35, p=0.005) and less authoritarian (r=0.41, p=0.001) parenting. Directly observed aversive child behaviour was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis, parent stress, and parent-reported child behaviour problems. This study revealed relationships between parents' self-efficacy and parenting practices across the domains of child behaviour management and atopic dermatitis management. Parents of children with more severe atopic dermatitis may have difficulty responding to child behaviour difficulties appropriately, potentially impacting on illness management. Incorporating parent and parenting support within treatment plans may improve not only child and family wellbeing, but also treatment outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Peru 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 47 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 18%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 5 10%
Unspecified 4 8%
Other 14 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Unspecified 7 14%
Social Sciences 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,450,753
of 12,299,679 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Nursing Studies
#882
of 1,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,313
of 266,396 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Nursing Studies
#36
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,299,679 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,446 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,396 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.