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The brain adapts to dishonesty

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Neuroscience, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 3,381)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
228 news outlets
blogs
32 blogs
twitter
1128 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
39 Facebook pages
googleplus
22 Google+ users
reddit
4 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
244 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
The brain adapts to dishonesty
Published in
Nature Neuroscience, October 2016
DOI 10.1038/nn.4426
Pubmed ID
Authors

Neil Garrett, Stephanie C Lazzaro, Dan Ariely, Tali Sharot, Garrett, Neil, Lazzaro, Stephanie C, Ariely, Dan, Sharot, Tali, Garrett, N, Lazzaro, SC, Ariely, D, Sharot, T, Stephanie C. Lazzaro

Abstract

Dishonesty is an integral part of our social world, influencing domains ranging from finance and politics to personal relationships. Anecdotally, digressions from a moral code are often described as a series of small breaches that grow over time. Here we provide empirical evidence for a gradual escalation of self-serving dishonesty and reveal a neural mechanism supporting it. Behaviorally, we show that the extent to which participants engage in self-serving dishonesty increases with repetition. Using functional MRI, we show that signal reduction in the amygdala is sensitive to the history of dishonest behavior, consistent with adaptation. Critically, the extent of reduced amygdala sensitivity to dishonesty on a present decision relative to the previous one predicts the magnitude of escalation of self-serving dishonesty on the next decision. The findings uncover a biological mechanism that supports a 'slippery slope': what begins as small acts of dishonesty can escalate into larger transgressions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,128 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 244 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
France 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Unknown 234 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 71 29%
Researcher 41 17%
Student > Bachelor 36 15%
Student > Master 35 14%
Student > Postgraduate 18 7%
Other 43 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 90 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 14%
Neuroscience 33 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 9%
Social Sciences 10 4%
Other 56 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2888. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2017.
All research outputs
#89
of 7,950,520 outputs
Outputs from Nature Neuroscience
#2
of 3,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7
of 240,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Neuroscience
#1
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,950,520 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,381 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,929 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.