Investigating the relationship between consultation length and patient experience: a cross-sectional study in primary care

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 1,782)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
67 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
Title
Investigating the relationship between consultation length and patient experience: a cross-sectional study in primary care
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, October 2016
DOI 10.3399/bjgp16x687733
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natasha Elmore, Jenni Burt, Gary Abel, Frances A Maratos, Jane Montague, John Campbell, Martin Roland, N. Elmore, J. Burt, G. Abel, F. A. Maratos, J. Montague, J. Campbell, M. Roland, Elmore, Natasha, Burt, Jenni, Abel, Gary, Maratos, Frances A, Montague, Jane, Campbell, John, Roland, Martin

Abstract

Longer consultations in primary care have been linked with better quality of care and improved health-related outcomes. However, there is little evidence of any potential association between consultation length and patient experience. To examine the relationship between consultation length and patient-reported communication, trust and confidence in the doctor, and overall satisfaction. Analysis of 440 videorecorded consultations and associated patient experience questionnaires from 13 primary care practices in England. Patients attending a face-to-face consultation with participating GPs consented to having their consultations videoed and completed a questionnaire. Consultation length was calculated from the videorecording. Linear regression (adjusting for patient and doctor demographics) was used to investigate associations between patient experience (overall communication, trust and confidence, and overall satisfaction) and consultation length. There was no evidence that consultation length was associated with any of the three measures of patient experience (P >0.3 for all). Adjusted changes on a 0-100 scale per additional minute of consultation were: communication score 0.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.20 to 0.25), trust and confidence in the doctor 0.07 (95% CI = -0.27 to 0.41), and satisfaction -0.14 (95% CI = -0.46 to 0.18). The authors found no association between patient experience measures of communication and consultation length, and patients may sometimes report good experiences from very short consultations. However, longer consultations may be required to achieve clinical effectiveness and patient safety: aspects also important for achieving high quality of care. Future research should continue to study the benefits of longer consultations, particularly for patients with complex multiple conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 67 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 35%
Other 4 24%
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 65%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 12%
Psychology 2 12%
Social Sciences 2 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 90. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2016.
All research outputs
#79,509
of 7,570,864 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#22
of 1,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,357
of 234,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#2
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,570,864 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,782 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,489 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.