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Quality of life of residents living in a city hosting mega-sport events: a longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2016
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Quality of life of residents living in a city hosting mega-sport events: a longitudinal study
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3777-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Pfitzner, Joerg Koenigstorfer

Abstract

It remains unknown whether and when the hosting of mega-sport events increases quality of life of host city residents. The aim of this study is to assess the changes in quality of life of host city residents over the course of hosting a mega-sport event until three months after the event, depending on residents' perception of the atmosphere during the event. The study was conducted in Rio de Janeiro, one of the host cities of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in soccer. Participants were recruited from a Brazilian market research agency's panel and surveyed online. The WHOQOL-BREF was used to measure quality of life of residents of Rio de Janeiro (n = 281) in three waves in the context of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Perceived atmosphere at the event was measured via an established scale. Piecewise latent growth models were used to analyze individual changes in the four domains of quality of life per se and depending on perceived atmosphere. There was no change in quality of life with respect to physical, social, psychological, and environmental health for all participants during the course of the event. However, residents who perceived a positive atmosphere rated the social and environmental domains of quality of life more positively right after the end (vs. at the beginning) of the World Cup. This increase sustained until three months after the event. Physical health (particularly at high levels of perceived atmosphere) and psychological health decreased from right after the event until three months after. There was no positive effect of the hosting of the mega-sport event on the four quality of life domains of the panel members (who were residents of a city hosting a mega-sport event) per se. The individual changes in quality of life vary by perception of atmosphere and by domain of quality of life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Researcher 5 10%
Professor 4 8%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 11 22%
Social Sciences 9 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 15 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2016.
All research outputs
#6,190,366
of 8,566,293 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,861
of 7,117 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,112
of 249,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#182
of 229 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,566,293 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,117 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 229 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.