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Treatment represents a key driver of metastatic cancer evolution

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, June 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
26 tweeters

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4 Mendeley
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Title
Treatment represents a key driver of metastatic cancer evolution
Published in
Cancer Research, June 2022
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-22-0562
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ditte Sigaard. Christensen, Johanne Ahrenfeldt, Mateo Sokač, Judit Kisistók, Martin K. Thomsen, Lasse Maretty, Nicholas McGranahan, Nicolai J. Birkbak

Abstract

Metastasis is the main cause of cancer death, yet the evolutionary processes behind it remain largely unknown. Here, through analysis of large panel-based genomic datasets from the AACR GENIE project, including 40,979 primary and metastatic tumors across 25 distinct cancer types, we explore how the evolutionary pressure of cancer metastasis shapes the selection of genomic drivers of cancer. The most commonly affected genes were TP53, MYC, and CDKN2A, with no specific pattern associated with metastatic disease. This suggests that, on a driver mutation level, the selective pressure operating in primary and metastatic tumors is similar. The most highly enriched individual driver mutations in metastatic tumors were mutations known to drive resistance to hormone therapies in breast and prostate cancer (ESR1 and AR), anti-EGFR therapy in non-small cell lung cancer (EGFR T790M), and imatinib in gastrointestinal cancer (KIT V654A). Specific mutational signatures were also associated with treatment in three cancer types, supporting clonal selection following anti-cancer therapy. Overall, this implies that initial acquisition of driver mutations is predominantly shaped by the tissue of origin, where specific mutations define the developing primary tumor and drive growth, immune escape, and tolerance to chromosomal instability. However, acquisition of driver mutations that contribute to metastatic disease is less specific, with the main genomic drivers of metastatic cancer evolution associating with resistance to therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 75%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 50%
Physics and Astronomy 1 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2022.
All research outputs
#1,973,762
of 21,745,818 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#1,469
of 17,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,878
of 313,964 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#23
of 147 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,745,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,488 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,964 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 147 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.