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Parent-mediated social communication therapy for young children with autism (PACT): long-term follow-up of a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in The Lancet, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
89 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
448 tweeters
facebook
63 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
236 Mendeley
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Title
Parent-mediated social communication therapy for young children with autism (PACT): long-term follow-up of a randomised controlled trial
Published in
The Lancet, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/s0140-6736(16)31229-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Pickles, Ann Le Couteur, Kathy Leadbitter, Erica Salomone, Rachel Cole-Fletcher, Hannah Tobin, Isobel Gammer, Jessica Lowry, George Vamvakas, Sarah Byford, Catherine Aldred, Vicky Slonims, Helen McConachie, Patricia Howlin, Jeremy R Parr, Tony Charman, Jonathan Green, Pickles, Andrew, Le Couteur, Ann, Leadbitter, Kathy, Salomone, Erica, Cole-Fletcher, Rachel, Tobin, Hannah, Gammer, Isobel, Lowry, Jessica, Vamvakas, George, Byford, Sarah, Aldred, Catherine, Slonims, Vicky, McConachie, Helen, Howlin, Patricia, Parr, Jeremy R, Charman, Tony, Green, Jonathan

Abstract

It is not known whether early intervention can improve long-term autism symptom outcomes. We aimed to follow-up the Preschool Autism Communication Trial (PACT), to investigate whether the PACT intervention had a long-term effect on autism symptoms and continued effects on parent and child social interaction. PACT was a randomised controlled trial of a parent-mediated social communication intervention for children aged 2-4 years with core autism. Follow-up ascertainment was done at three specialised clinical services centres in the UK (London, Manchester, and Newcastle) at a median of 5·75 years (IQR 5·42-5·92) from the original trial endpoint. The main blinded outcomes were the comparative severity score (CSS) from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), the Dyadic Communication Assessment Measure (DCMA) of the proportion of child initiatiations when interacting with the parent, and an expressive-receptive language composite. All analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. PACT is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN58133827. 121 (80%) of the 152 trial participants (59 [77%] of 77 assigned to PACT intervention vs 62 [83%] of 75 assigned to treatment as usual) were traced and consented to be assessed between July, 2013, and September, 2014. Mean age at follow-up was 10·5 years (SD 0·8). Group difference in favour of the PACT intervention based on ADOS CSS of log-odds effect size (ES) was 0·64 (95% CI 0·07 to 1·20) at treatment endpoint and ES 0·70 (95% CI -0·05 to 1·47) at follow-up, giving an overall reduction in symptom severity over the course of the whole trial and follow-up period (ES 0·55, 95% CI 0·14 to 0·91, p=0·004). Group difference in DCMA child initiations at follow-up showed a Cohen's d ES of 0·29 (95% CI -0.02 to 0.57) and was significant over the course of the study (ES 0·33, 95% CI 0·11 to 0·57, p=0·004). There were no group differences in the language composite at follow-up (ES 0·15, 95% CI -0·23 to 0·53). The results are the first to show long-term symptom reduction after a randomised controlled trial of early intervention in autism spectrum disorder. They support the clinical value of the PACT intervention and have implications for developmental theory. Medical Research Council.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 448 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 236 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 3%
United Kingdom 5 2%
Malaysia 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 215 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 47 20%
Student > Master 39 17%
Researcher 32 14%
Student > Bachelor 25 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 9%
Other 72 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 95 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 40 17%
Social Sciences 19 8%
Unspecified 18 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 7%
Other 48 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1120. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2018.
All research outputs
#2,086
of 11,480,436 outputs
Outputs from The Lancet
#73
of 29,035 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139
of 254,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Lancet
#2
of 497 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,480,436 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29,035 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,569 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 497 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.