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Wildfire, climate, and invasive grass interactions negatively impact an indicator species by reshaping sagebrush ecosystems

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
84 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
180 Mendeley
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Title
Wildfire, climate, and invasive grass interactions negatively impact an indicator species by reshaping sagebrush ecosystems
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1606898113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter S. Coates, Mark A. Ricca, Brian G. Prochazka, Matthew L. Brooks, Kevin E. Doherty, Travis Kroger, Erik J. Blomberg, Christian A. Hagen, Michael L. Casazza

Abstract

Iconic sagebrush ecosystems of the American West are threatened by larger and more frequent wildfires that can kill sagebrush and facilitate invasion by annual grasses, creating a cycle that alters sagebrush ecosystem recovery post disturbance. Thwarting this accelerated grass-fire cycle is at the forefront of current national conservation efforts, yet its impacts on wildlife populations inhabiting these ecosystems have not been quantified rigorously. Within a Bayesian framework, we modeled 30 y of wildfire and climatic effects on population rates of change of a sagebrush-obligate species, the greater sage-grouse, across the Great Basin of western North America. Importantly, our modeling also accounted for variation in sagebrush recovery time post fire as determined by underlying soil properties that influence ecosystem resilience to disturbance and resistance to invasion. Our results demonstrate that the cumulative loss of sagebrush to direct and indirect effects of wildfire has contributed strongly to declining sage-grouse populations over the past 30 y at large spatial scales. Moreover, long-lasting effects from wildfire nullified pulses of sage-grouse population growth that typically follow years of higher precipitation. If wildfire trends continue unabated, model projections indicate sage-grouse populations will be reduced to 43% of their current numbers over the next three decades. Our results provide a timely example of how altered fire regimes are disrupting recovery of sagebrush ecosystems and leading to substantial declines of a widespread indicator species. Accordingly, we present scenario-based stochastic projections to inform conservation actions that may help offset the adverse effects of wildfire on sage-grouse and other wildlife populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 180 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 175 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 21%
Researcher 33 18%
Student > Master 31 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 7%
Professor 8 4%
Other 22 12%
Unknown 35 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 32%
Environmental Science 39 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 19 11%
Engineering 4 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 1%
Other 16 9%
Unknown 42 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2021.
All research outputs
#801,611
of 20,832,759 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#13,517
of 95,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,953
of 314,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#328
of 979 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,832,759 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 95,030 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,214 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 979 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.