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Cancer among Immigrants: Diverse Histories, Diverse Disparities, Diverse Opportunities to Promote Equity

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, July 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

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16 tweeters
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Title
Cancer among Immigrants: Diverse Histories, Diverse Disparities, Diverse Opportunities to Promote Equity
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, July 2022
DOI 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-22-0337
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward Christopher Dee, Scarlett Lin Gomez

Abstract

Immigrants-people who live in a country different from their country of birth-constitute approximately 250 million people globally. Migrants are diverse in their reasons for immigration, ranging from those who are forced to flee their home country for survival, to those seeking a better life. Migrants face diverse barriers in access to care. Therefore, it is critical in the context of cancer health to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of cancer amongst migrants to inform policy, screening, and management. In this issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, Yu and colleagues evaluate patterns in the incidence of infection-associated cancers-cancers of the stomach, liver, and cervix-amongst migrants in Australia. They demonstrate that the incidence of infection-related cancers is heterogeneous amongst immigrant populations, underscoring the value of studies that disaggregate groups in ways that reflect the diversity amongst these groups. In this editorial, we contextualize the work of Yu and colleagues in the setting of studies exploring cancer health amongst migrants in various parts of the world. We call attention to disparities in risk factors, prevention, screening, and access to care. Finally, we call on the research and medical communities to work to elucidate their diverse stories, understand their diverse disparities, and act upon diverse opportunities to promote equity. See related article by Yu et al., p. 1394.

Twitter Demographics

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Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2022.
All research outputs
#2,635,165
of 21,675,460 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#807
of 4,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,710
of 274,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
#9
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,675,460 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,425 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,996 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.