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Benefits and drawbacks of electronic health record systems

Overview of attention for article published in Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, May 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 140)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
223 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
825 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
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Title
Benefits and drawbacks of electronic health record systems
Published in
Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, May 2011
DOI 10.2147/rmhp.s12985
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nir Menachemi, Collum

Abstract

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 that was signed into law as part of the "stimulus package" represents the largest US initiative to date that is designed to encourage widespread use of electronic health records (EHRs). In light of the changes anticipated from this policy initiative, the purpose of this paper is to review and summarize the literature on the benefits and drawbacks of EHR systems. Much of the literature has focused on key EHR functionalities, including clinical decision support systems, computerized order entry systems, and health information exchange. Our paper describes the potential benefits of EHRs that include clinical outcomes (eg, improved quality, reduced medical errors), organizational outcomes (eg, financial and operational benefits), and societal outcomes (eg, improved ability to conduct research, improved population health, reduced costs). Despite these benefits, studies in the literature highlight drawbacks associated with EHRs, which include the high upfront acquisition costs, ongoing maintenance costs, and disruptions to workflows that contribute to temporary losses in productivity that are the result of learning a new system. Moreover, EHRs are associated with potential perceived privacy concerns among patients, which are further addressed legislatively in the HITECH Act. Overall, experts and policymakers believe that significant benefits to patients and society can be realized when EHRs are widely adopted and used in a "meaningful" way.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 825 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 1%
Indonesia 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
United Arab Emirates 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 800 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 274 33%
Student > Bachelor 137 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 103 12%
Unspecified 66 8%
Student > Postgraduate 61 7%
Other 184 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 227 28%
Computer Science 164 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 111 13%
Unspecified 82 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 57 7%
Other 184 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2018.
All research outputs
#386,112
of 13,555,367 outputs
Outputs from Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
#4
of 140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,718
of 175,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,555,367 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 140 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,285 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them