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Concentration and retention of Toxoplasma gondii surrogates from seawater by red abalone (Haliotis rufescens)

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology, August 2016
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3 tweeters

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6 Dimensions

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Concentration and retention of Toxoplasma gondii surrogates from seawater by red abalone (Haliotis rufescens)
Published in
Parasitology, August 2016
DOI 10.1017/s0031182016001359
Pubmed ID
Authors

KRISTEN C. SCHOTT, COLIN KRUSOR, M. TIM TINKER, JAMES MOORE, PATRICIA A. CONRAD, KAREN SHAPIRO

Abstract

Small marine snails and abalone have been identified as high- and low-risk prey items, respectively, for exposure of threatened southern sea otters to Toxoplasma gondii, a zoonotic parasite that can cause fatal encephalitis in animals and humans. While recent work has characterized snails as paratenic hosts for T. gondii, the ability of abalone to vector the parasite has not been evaluated. To further elucidate why abalone predation may be protective against T. gondii exposure, this study aimed to determine whether: (1) abalone are physiologically capable of acquiring T. gondii; and (2) abalone and snails differ in their ability to concentrate and retain the parasite. Abalone were exposed to T. gondii surrogate microspheres for 24 h, and fecal samples were examined for 2 weeks following exposure. Concentration of surrogates was 2-3 orders of magnitude greater in abalone feces than in the spiked seawater, and excretion of surrogates continued for 14 days post-exposure. These results indicate that, physiologically, abalone and snails can equally vector T. gondii as paratenic hosts. Reduced risk of T. gondii infection in abalone-specializing otters may therefore result from abalone's high nutritional value, which implies otters must consume fewer animals to meet their caloric needs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Student > Master 5 22%
Researcher 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 13%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Computer Science 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2016.
All research outputs
#8,470,194
of 14,638,436 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology
#1,263
of 1,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,428
of 290,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology
#18
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,638,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,945 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,344 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.