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Design, implementation and evaluation of a national campaign to deliver 18 million free long-lasting insecticidal nets to uncovered sleeping spaces in Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
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Title
Design, implementation and evaluation of a national campaign to deliver 18 million free long-lasting insecticidal nets to uncovered sleeping spaces in Tanzania
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-12-85
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabine Renggli, Renata Mandike, Karen Kramer, Faith Patrick, Nick J Brown, Peter D McElroy, Wilhelmina Rimisho, Amina Msengwa, Ally Mnzava, Rose Nathan, Romanus Mtung’e, Rita Mgullo, Jane Lweikiza, Christian Lengeler

Abstract

Since 2004, the Tanzanian National Voucher Scheme has increased availability and accessibility of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) to pregnant women and infants by subsidizing the cost of nets purchased. From 2008 to 2010, a mass distribution campaign delivered nine million long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) free-of-charge to children under-five years of age in Tanzania mainland. In 2010 and 2011, a Universal Coverage Campaign (UCC) led by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW) was implemented to cover all sleeping spaces not yet reached through previous initiatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Tanzania, United Republic of 3 2%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Sudan 1 <1%
Madagascar 1 <1%
Malawi 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Unknown 149 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 48 30%
Researcher 32 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 11%
Student > Bachelor 16 10%
Unspecified 12 7%
Other 36 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 53 33%
Social Sciences 25 15%
Unspecified 24 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 10%
Other 28 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2013.
All research outputs
#5,436,324
of 10,704,475 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,831
of 3,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,383
of 127,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#38
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,704,475 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,318 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 127,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.