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Alcohol advertising and public health: systems perspectives versus narrow perspectives

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978), October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
174 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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80 Mendeley
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Title
Alcohol advertising and public health: systems perspectives versus narrow perspectives
Published in
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978), October 2016
DOI 10.1136/jech-2016-207644
Pubmed ID
Authors

M Petticrew, I Shemilt, T Lorenc, T M Marteau, G J Melendez-Torres, A O'Mara-Eves, K Stautz, J Thomas

Abstract

Alcohol consumption is influenced by a complex causal system of interconnected psychological, behavioural, social, economic, legal and environmental factors. These factors are shaped by governments (eg, licensing laws and taxation), by consumers (eg, patterns of alcohol consumption drive demand) and by alcohol industry practices, such as advertising. The marketing and advertising of alcoholic products contributes to an 'alcogenic environment' and is a modifiable influence on alcohol consumption and harm. The public health perspective is that there is sufficient evidence that alcohol advertising influences consumption. The alcohol industry disputes this, asserting that advertising only aims to help consumers choose between brands. We review the evidence from recent systematic reviews, including their theoretical and methodological assumptions, to help understand what conclusions can be drawn about the relationships between alcohol advertising, advertising restrictions and alcohol consumption. A wide evidence base needs to be drawn on to provide a system-level overview of the relationship between alcohol advertising, advertising restrictions and consumption. Advertising aims to influence not just consumption, but also to influence awareness, attitudes and social norms; this is because advertising is a system-level intervention with multiple objectives. Given this, assessments of the effects of advertising restrictions which focus only on sales or consumption are insufficient and may be misleading. For this reason, previous systematic reviews, such as the 2014 Cochrane review on advertising restrictions (Siegfried et al) contribute important, but incomplete representations of 'the evidence' needed to inform the public health case for policy decisions on alcohol advertising. We conclude that an unintended consequence of narrow, linear framings of complex system-level issues is that they can produce misleading answers. Systems problems require systems perspectives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 174 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 4%
Australia 1 1%
Ireland 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 74 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 21%
Student > Master 16 20%
Unspecified 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Professor 6 8%
Other 22 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 20 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 20%
Psychology 15 19%
Unspecified 14 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Other 9 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 102. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2018.
All research outputs
#150,540
of 13,309,606 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978)
#107
of 3,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,091
of 287,890 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1978)
#3
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,309,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,408 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,890 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.