↓ Skip to main content

Measuring sperm backflow following female orgasm: a new method

Overview of attention for article published in Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Measuring sperm backflow following female orgasm: a new method
Published in
Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, October 2016
DOI 10.3402/snp.v6.31927
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert King, Maria Dempsey, Katherine A. Valentine

Abstract

Human female orgasm is a vexed question in the field while there is credible evidence of cryptic female choice that has many hallmarks of orgasm in other species. Our initial goal was to produce a proof of concept for allowing females to study an aspect of infertility in a home setting, specifically by aligning the study of human infertility and increased fertility with the study of other mammalian fertility. In the latter case - the realm of oxytocin-mediated sperm retention mechanisms seems to be at work in terms of ultimate function (differential sperm retention) while the proximate function (rapid transport or cervical tenting) remains unresolved. A repeated measures design using an easily taught technique in a natural setting was used. Participants were a small (n=6), non-representative sample of females. The introduction of a sperm-simulant combined with an orgasm-producing technique using a vibrator/home massager and other easily supplied materials. The sperm flowback (simulated) was measured using a technique that can be used in a home setting. There was a significant difference in simulant retention between the orgasm (M=4.08, SD=0.17) and non-orgasm (M=3.30, SD=0.22) conditions; t (5)=7.02, p=0.001. Cohen's d=3.97, effect size r=0.89. This indicates a medium to small effect size. This method could allow females to test an aspect of sexual response that has been linked to lowered fertility in a home setting with minimal training. It needs to be replicated with a larger sample size.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 29%
Researcher 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Student > Master 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 8 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Arts and Humanities 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Psychology 2 8%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 9 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 153. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2021.
All research outputs
#169,899
of 19,198,440 outputs
Outputs from Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology
#6
of 50 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,030
of 305,573 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,198,440 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 50 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.7. This one scored the same or higher as 44 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,573 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them