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I drink therefore I am: Validating alcohol-related implicit association tests.

Overview of attention for article published in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 236)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

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mendeley
122 Mendeley
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Title
I drink therefore I am: Validating alcohol-related implicit association tests.
Published in
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, January 2012
DOI 10.1037/a0027640
Pubmed ID
Abstract

There is an imperative to predict hazardous drinking among college students. Implicit measures have been useful in predicting unique variance in drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, they have been developed to test different theories of drinking and have rarely been directly compared with one another. Thus, their comparative utility is unclear. The current study examined five alcohol-related variants of the Implicit Association Test (IAT) in a sample of 300 undergraduates and sought to establish their predictive validity. Results indicated that the Drinking Identity IAT, which measured associations of "drinker" with "me," was the most consistent predictor of alcohol consumption, alcohol problems, and alcohol cravings. It also had the highest internal consistency and test-retest reliability scores. The results for the Alcohol Excitement and Alcohol Approach IATs were also promising, but their psychometric properties were less consistent. Although the two IATs were positively correlated with all of the drinking outcome variables, they did not consistently predict unique variance in those variables after controlling for explicit measures. They also had relatively lower internal consistencies and test-retest reliabilities. Ultimately, results suggested that implicit drinking identity may be a useful tool for predicting alcohol consumption, problems, and cravings and a potential target for prevention and intervention efforts.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Germany 2 2%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 111 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 30%
Student > Master 19 16%
Researcher 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 10%
Other 24 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 84 69%
Unspecified 14 11%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 4%
Arts and Humanities 3 2%
Other 9 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2013.
All research outputs
#587,958
of 3,684,317 outputs
Outputs from Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
#42
of 236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,485
of 86,047 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
#3
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,684,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 236 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 86,047 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.