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Mapping the Fetomaternal Peripheral Immune System at Term Pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Immunology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Mapping the Fetomaternal Peripheral Immune System at Term Pregnancy
Published in
The Journal of Immunology, October 2016
DOI 10.4049/jimmunol.1601195
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gabriela K. Fragiadakis, Quentin J. Baca, Pier Federico Gherardini, Edward A. Ganio, Dyani K. Gaudilliere, Martha Tingle, Hope L. Lancero, Leslie S. McNeil, Matthew H. Spitzer, Ronald J. Wong, Gary M. Shaw, Gary L. Darmstadt, Karl G. Sylvester, Virginia D. Winn, Brendan Carvalho, David B. Lewis, David K. Stevenson, Garry P. Nolan, Nima Aghaeepour, Martin S. Angst, Brice L. Gaudilliere

Abstract

Preterm labor and infections are the leading causes of neonatal deaths worldwide. During pregnancy, immunological cross talk between the mother and her fetus is critical for the maintenance of pregnancy and the delivery of an immunocompetent neonate. A precise understanding of healthy fetomaternal immunity is the important first step to identifying dysregulated immune mechanisms driving adverse maternal or neonatal outcomes. This study combined single-cell mass cytometry of paired peripheral and umbilical cord blood samples from mothers and their neonates with a graphical approach developed for the visualization of high-dimensional data to provide a high-resolution reference map of the cellular composition and functional organization of the healthy fetal and maternal immune systems at birth. The approach enabled mapping of known phenotypical and functional characteristics of fetal immunity (including the functional hyperresponsiveness of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and the global blunting of innate immune responses). It also allowed discovery of new properties that distinguish the fetal and maternal immune systems. For example, examination of paired samples revealed differences in endogenous signaling tone that are unique to a mother and her offspring, including increased ERK1/2, MAPK-activated protein kinase 2, rpS6, and CREB phosphorylation in fetal Tbet(+)CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, B cells, and CD56(lo)CD16(+) NK cells and decreased ERK1/2, MAPK-activated protein kinase 2, and STAT1 phosphorylation in fetal intermediate and nonclassical monocytes. This highly interactive functional map of healthy fetomaternal immunity builds the core reference for a growing data repository that will allow inferring deviations from normal associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 31%
Researcher 9 20%
Unspecified 6 13%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Other 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 29%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 22%
Unspecified 9 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2016.
All research outputs
#2,164,495
of 8,702,492 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Immunology
#1,033
of 7,081 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,296
of 248,617 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Immunology
#30
of 140 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,702,492 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,081 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,617 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 140 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.