↓ Skip to main content

Age influence on renalase and catecholamines concentration in hypertensive patients, including maintained dialysis

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Age influence on renalase and catecholamines concentration in hypertensive patients, including maintained dialysis
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s106109
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edyta Zbroch, Dominika Musialowska, Ewa Koc-Zorawska, Jolanta Malyszko

Abstract

Hypertension in elderly patients is one of the main problems in cardiovascular diseases. The sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity seen in older patients is a known risk factor for hypertension and other cardiovascular events as well as chronic kidney disease. Renalase, secreted by the kidney and circulated in blood, may regulate the sympathetic tone by catecholamine degradation and in this way has an impact on cardiovascular and renal complications. To assess the impact of age on renalase and catecholamine concentration in hypertensive patients, including those on dialyses and its possible relation to blood pressure control and cardiovascular disease. The study cohort of 211 patients was divided into two groups according to age below 65 years (range 19-64) and above 65 years (range 65-86). The older group represented 38% of the whole studied population and 75% of them were dialyzed. The two groups of different ages were also divided into dialysis and nondialysis subgroups. The serum renalase, dopamine, and norepinephrine concentration together with blood pressure value and echocardiography were assessed. Patients aged 65 years and more had higher renalase (20.59 vs 13.14 µg/mL, P=0.02) and dopamine (41.71 vs 15.46 pg/mL, P<0.001) concentration as well as lower diastolic blood pressure (75.33 vs 85 mmHg, P=0.001), advanced abnormalities in echocardiography, and more often suffered from diabetes and coronary artery disease. The significant correlation between age and renalase (r=0.16; P=0.019), norepinephrine (r=0.179; P=0.013), and dopamine (r=0.21; P=0.003) was found in the whole study population. In the nondialysis subgroup, 44% had chronic kidney disease, mostly in the stage 2 (83%). There was a significantly higher norepinephrine concentration (1.21 vs 0.87 ng/mL; P=0.008) in older patients of that population. In the dialysis subgroup, there were no differences between renalase and catecholamine level but older participants had lower diastolic blood pressure (69 vs 78 mmHg, P=0.001) and ejection fraction (51% vs 56.8%, P=0.03). The elevated renalase level in older hypertensive patients is related rather to kidney function and cardiovascular diseases than to age itself. Thus, renalase appears to be the possible new marker of these indications in this special population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 20%
Student > Master 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Professor 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2016.
All research outputs
#6,212,669
of 8,594,027 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#701
of 1,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,440
of 247,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#32
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,594,027 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,025 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,316 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.