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Ureaplasma parvum genotype, combined vaginal colonisation with Candida albicans, and spontaneous preterm birth in an Australian cohort of pregnant women

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 patent

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Ureaplasma parvum genotype, combined vaginal colonisation with Candida albicans, and spontaneous preterm birth in an Australian cohort of pregnant women
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1110-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew S. Payne, Demelza J. Ireland, Rory Watts, Elizabeth A. Nathan, Lucy L. Furfaro, Matthew W. Kemp, Jeffrey A. Keelan, John P. Newnham

Abstract

Detection of Ureaplasma, Mycoplasma and Candida spp. in the vagina during pregnancy has previously been associated with preterm birth (PTB). However, the prevalence of these microorganisms and the associated obstetric risks (likely to be population-specific) have not been determined in Australian women; furthermore, in the case of Ureaplasma spp., very few studies have attempted characterisation at the species level and none have examined genotype/serovar status to further refine risk assessment. In order to address these issues we sampled the vaginal fluid of 191 pregnant Australian women at three time points in pregnancy. Culture methods were used for detection of Ureaplasma spp. and Candida spp., and real-time PCR was used for speciation of U. parvum and U. urealyticum, non-albicans Candida spp., Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium. High-resolution melt PCR was used to genotype U. parvum. Data on various lifestyle factors (including sex during pregnancy and smoking), antimicrobial use and pregnancy outcome were collected on all participants. Chi-square tests were used to assess the association of vaginal microorganisms with PTB. Detection of Ureaplasma spp. was higher among spontaneous PTB cases, specifically in the presence of U. parvum [77 % preterm (95 % confidence interval (CI) 50-100 %) vs. 36 % term (CI: 29-43 %), p = 0.004], but not U. urealyticum. The association with PTB strengthened when U. parvum genotype SV6 was detected (54 % preterm (CI: 22-85 %) vs. 15 % term (CI: 10-20 %), p = 0.002); this genotype was also present in 80 % (4/5) of cases of PTB <34 weeks gestation. When present with Candida albicans in the same sample, the association with PTB remained strong for both U. parvum [46 % preterm (CI: 15-78 %) vs. 13 % term (CI: 8-18 %), p = 0.005] and U. parvum genotype SV6 [39 % preterm (CI: 8-69 %) vs. 7 % term (CI: 3-11 %), p = 0.003]. With the exception of Candida glabrata, vaginal colonisation status for all organisms was stable throughout pregnancy. Smoking significantly increased the likelihood of detection of all target organisms. These data suggest that the presence of different species and serovars of Ureaplasma spp. in the vagina confers an increased risk of spontaneous PTB, findings which may be useful in risk assessment for identifying women who would benefit from antimicrobial treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 18%
Student > Master 9 16%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 49%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 9 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2019.
All research outputs
#3,549,092
of 15,147,785 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#928
of 2,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,777
of 292,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#107
of 302 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,147,785 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,800 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,718 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 302 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.