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The Janus Face of Death Receptor Signaling during Tumor Immunoediting

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in immunology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
The Janus Face of Death Receptor Signaling during Tumor Immunoediting
Published in
Frontiers in immunology, October 2016
DOI 10.3389/fimmu.2016.00446
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eimear O’ Reilly, Andrea Tirincsi, Susan E. Logue, Eva Szegezdi

Abstract

Cancer immune surveillance is essential for the inhibition of carcinogenesis. Malignantly transformed cells can be recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems through different mechanisms. Immune effector cells induce extrinsic cell death in the identified tumor cells by expressing death ligand cytokines of the tumor necrosis factor ligand family. However, some tumor cells can escape immune elimination and progress. Acquisition of resistance to the death ligand-induced apoptotic pathway can be obtained through cleavage of effector cell expressed death ligands into a poorly active form, mutations or silencing of the death receptors, or overexpression of decoy receptors and pro-survival proteins. Although the immune system is highly effective in the elimination of malignantly transformed cells, abnormal/dysfunctional death ligand signaling curbs its cytotoxicity. Moreover, DRs can also transmit pro-survival and pro-migratory signals. Consequently, dysfunctional death receptor-mediated apoptosis/necroptosis signaling does not only give a passive resistance against cell death but actively drives tumor cell motility, invasion, and contributes to consequent metastasis. This dual contribution of the death receptor signaling in both the early, elimination phase, and then in the late, escape phase of the tumor immunoediting process is discussed in this review. Death receptor agonists still hold potential for cancer therapy since they can execute the tumor-eliminating immune effector function even in the absence of activation of the immune system against the tumor. The opportunities and challenges of developing death receptor agonists into effective cancer therapeutics are also discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 35%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Master 5 16%
Unspecified 4 13%
Professor 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 26%
Unspecified 7 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2016.
All research outputs
#3,579,909
of 13,361,086 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in immunology
#1,798
of 8,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,023
of 287,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in immunology
#50
of 222 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,361,086 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,192 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,531 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 222 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.