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National Trends in Hospitalizations for Opioid Poisonings Among Children and Adolescents, 1997 to 2012

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Pediatrics, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 1,370)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
190 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
335 tweeters
facebook
18 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
Title
National Trends in Hospitalizations for Opioid Poisonings Among Children and Adolescents, 1997 to 2012
Published in
JAMA Pediatrics, October 2016
DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2154
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julie R. Gaither, John M. Leventhal, Sheryl A. Ryan, Deepa R. Camenga

Abstract

National data show a parallel relationship between recent trends in opioid prescribing practices and hospitalizations for opioid poisonings in adults. No similar estimates exist describing hospitalizations for opioid poisonings in children and adolescents. To describe the incidence and characteristics of hospitalizations attributed to opioid poisonings in children and adolescents. Retrospective analysis of serial cross-sectional data from a nationally representative sample of US pediatric hospital discharge records collected every 3 years from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2012. The Kids' Inpatient Database was used to identify 13 052 discharge records for patients aged 1 to 19 years who were hospitalized for opioid poisonings. Data were analyzed within the collection time frame. Poisonings attributed to prescription opioids were identified by codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. In adolescents aged 15 to 19 years, poisonings attributed to heroin were also identified. Census estimates were used to calculate incidence per 100 000 population. The Cochran-Armitage test for trend was used to assess for changes in incidence over time. From 1997 to 2012, a total of 13 052 (95% CI, 12 500-13 604) hospitalizations for prescription opioid poisonings were identified. The annual incidence of hospitalizations for opioid poisonings per 100 000 children aged 1 to 19 years rose from 1.40 (95% CI, 1.24-1.56) to 3.71 (95% CI, 3.44-3.98), an increase of 165% (P for trend, <.001). Among children 1 to 4 years of age, the incidence increased from 0.86 (95% CI, 0.60-1.12) to 2.62 (95% CI, 2.17-3.08), an increase of 205% (P for trend, <.001). For adolescents aged 15 to 19 years, the incidence increased from 3.69 (95% CI, 3.20-4.17) to 10.17 (95% CI, 9.48-10.85), an increase of 176% (P for trend, <.001). In this age group, poisonings from heroin increased from 0.96 (95% CI, 0.75-1.18) to 2.51 (95% CI, 2.21-2.80), an increase of 161% (P for trend, <.001); poisonings involving methadone increased from 0.10 (95% CI, 0.03-0.16) to 1.05 (95% CI, 0.87-1.23), an increase of 950% (P for trend, <.001). During the course of 16 years, hospitalizations attributed to opioid poisonings rose nearly 2-fold in the pediatric population. Hospitalizations increased across all age groups, yet young children and older adolescents were most vulnerable to the risks of opioid exposure. Mitigating these risks will require comprehensive strategies that target opioid storage, packaging, and misuse.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 335 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 20%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 20%
Researcher 4 16%
Professor 3 12%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 68%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 8%
Psychology 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1798. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2017.
All research outputs
#346
of 7,744,068 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Pediatrics
#3
of 1,370 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23
of 235,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Pediatrics
#2
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,744,068 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,370 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 63.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,790 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.