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The impact of in situ breast cancer and family history on risk of subsequent breast cancer events and mortality - a population-based study from Sweden

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, October 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of in situ breast cancer and family history on risk of subsequent breast cancer events and mortality - a population-based study from Sweden
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13058-016-0764-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helena Sackey, Miao Hui, Kamila Czene, Helena Verkooijen, Gustaf Edgren, Jan Frisell, Mikael Hartman

Abstract

The clinical behavior of in situ breast cancer is incompletely understood and several factors have been associated with invasive recurrence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term risk of subsequent breast cancer and mortality among women diagnosed with in situ breast cancer, in relation to family history METHODS: Using the population-based Swedish Multi-Generation and Cancer Registers we identified 8111 women diagnosed with in situ breast cancer between 1980 and 2004. We used standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) to measure the relative risk of subsequent invasive or contralateral in situ breast cancer and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for relative risks of death. Among women diagnosed with in situ breast cancer, the cumulative 10-year and 20-year risk for subsequent contralateral or ipsilateral invasive cancer was approximately 10 % and 18 %, respectively. The risk of subsequent invasive breast cancer was increased more than 4-fold (SIR 4.6 (95 % CI 4.2 - 4.9)) among women with in situ breast cancer as compared to women in the general population and the risk of contralateral in situ breast cancer was increased almost 16-fold (SIR 16.0 (95 % CI 13.2-19.1)). Having a family history of breast cancer increased the risk of contralateral invasive breast cancer by almost 50 % (incidence rate ratio 1.5 (95 % CI 1.0-2.0)). Women under forty years old at diagnosis, without family history, had a 7-fold increased risk, and those with a family history had a 14-fold increased risk for subsequent invasive breast cancer with SIRs of 7.2 (95 % CI 4.8-10.5) and 14.3 (95 % CI 7.4-25.0), respectively. The overall risk of death in women with in situ breast cancer was significantly increased by 30 % compared to the general population but was highly dependent on the occurrence of a second invasive cancer event (SMR 1.3 (95 % CI 1.2-1.4)). Among women with in situ breast cancer, a positive family history increases the risk of contralateral invasive breast cancer by almost 50 %. The risk of subsequent invasive breast cancer and mortality is substantially higher in younger women, which should be taken into account when planning their treatment and follow up.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Student > Master 3 14%
Other 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Mathematics 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2016.
All research outputs
#6,774,825
of 11,334,759 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#872
of 1,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,323
of 253,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#19
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,334,759 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,295 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,470 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.