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Prevalence of hepatic steatosis in an urban population in the United States: Impact of ethnicity

Overview of attention for article published in Hepatology, January 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 7,282)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
4 tweeters
patent
7 patents

Citations

dimensions_citation
2501 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
722 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Prevalence of hepatic steatosis in an urban population in the United States: Impact of ethnicity
Published in
Hepatology, January 2004
DOI 10.1002/hep.20466
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey D. Browning, Lidia S. Szczepaniak, Robert Dobbins, Pamela Nuremberg, Jay D. Horton, Jonathan C. Cohen, Scott M. Grundy, Helen H. Hobbs

Abstract

Despite the increasing prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), its pathogenesis and clinical significance remain poorly defined. In this study, we examined and compared the distribution of hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC) in 2,287 subjects from a multiethnic, population-based sample (32.1% white, 48.3% black, and 17.5% Hispanic) using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. HTGC varied over a wide range (0.0%-41.7%; median, 3.6%) in the population. Almost one third of the population had hepatic steatosis, and most subjects with hepatic steatosis had normal levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (79%). The frequency of hepatic steatosis varied significantly with ethnicity (45% in Hispanics; 33% in whites; 24% in blacks) and sex (42% in white men; 24% in white women). The higher prevalence of hepatic steatosis in Hispanics was due to the higher prevalence of obesity and insulin resistance in this ethnic group. However, the lower frequency of hepatic steatosis in blacks was not explained by ethnic differences in body mass index, insulin resistance, ethanol ingestion, or medication use. The prevalence of hepatic steatosis was greater in men than women among whites, but not in blacks or Hispanics. The ethnic differences in the frequency of hepatic steatosis in this study mirror those observed previously for NAFLD-related cirrhosis (Hispanics > whites > blacks). In conclusion, the significant ethnic and sex differences in the prevalence of hepatic steatosis documented in this study may have a profound impact on susceptibility to steatosis-related liver disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 722 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 1%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 7 <1%
Unknown 689 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 126 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 107 15%
Student > Master 106 15%
Student > Bachelor 73 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 62 9%
Other 183 25%
Unknown 65 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 324 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 104 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 71 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 26 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 2%
Other 81 11%
Unknown 101 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 171. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2020.
All research outputs
#100,696
of 15,094,246 outputs
Outputs from Hepatology
#29
of 7,282 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#867
of 153,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Hepatology
#1
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,094,246 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,282 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 153,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.