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The application of One Health concept to an outdoor problem-based learning activity for veterinary students

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary World, September 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
The application of One Health concept to an outdoor problem-based learning activity for veterinary students
Published in
Veterinary World, September 2016
DOI 10.14202/vetworld.2016.955-959
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. A. Tengku Rinalfi Putra, Mohd Noor Mohd Hezmee, N. B. Farhana, H. A. Hassim, A. R. Intan-Shameha, I. H. Lokman, A. Yusof Hamali, M. S. Salisi, A. A. A. Ghani, M. S. Shahudin, M. A. L. Qayyum, A. Hafandi, R. Speare, S. G. Fenwick

Abstract

The One Health (OH) approach, which seeks to bring together human and animal health, is particularly suited to the effective management of zoonotic diseases across both sectors. To overcome professional silos, OH needs to be taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a problem-based learning activity using the OH approach that was conducted outdoors for 3(rd)-year veterinary students in Malaysia. A total of 118 students, divided into two groups, completed the activity which spanned 1½ days at a deer park adjacent to a wilderness area. Students were asked to evaluate the activity using an online survey that had quantitative and qualitative components. Response rate was 69.5%. The activity was rated excellent by 69.5% and good by 30.4%. Levels of satisfaction were high on a range of criteria. 97.5% of students intended to take action in their studies as a result of what they had learned. Delivery of an outdoor problem-based learning activity using OH approach was very successful in terms of participation, knowledge delivery and understanding, and the willingness of students to integrate OH into their future practice. For the improvement of future programs, the involvement of other disciplines (such as Medical, Biology, Biotechnology, Biomedical, and Public Health) is being considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Researcher 3 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 5 21%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Computer Science 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 6 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2016.
All research outputs
#6,534,687
of 8,607,424 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary World
#72
of 180 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,739
of 246,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary World
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,607,424 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 180 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.9. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,983 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.