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Nicotine activates TRPM5-dependent and independent taste pathways

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
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2 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
Title
Nicotine activates TRPM5-dependent and independent taste pathways
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2009
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0810184106
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. J. Oliveira-Maia, J. R. Stapleton-Kotloski, V. Lyall, T.-H. T. Phan, S. Mummalaneni, P. Melone, J. A. DeSimone, M. A. L. Nicolelis, S. A. Simon

Abstract

The orosensory responses elicited by nicotine are relevant for the development and maintenance of addiction to tobacco products. However, although nicotine is described as bitter tasting, the molecular and neural substrates encoding the taste of nicotine are unclear. Here, rats and mice were used to determine whether nicotine activates peripheral and central taste pathways via TRPM5-dependent mechanisms, which are essential for responses to other bitter tastants such as quinine, and/or via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). When compared with wild-type mice, Trpm5(-/-) mice had reduced, but not abolished, chorda tympani (CT) responses to nicotine. In both genotypes, lingual application of mecamylamine, a nAChR-antagonist, inhibited CT nerve responses to nicotine and reduced behavioral responses of aversion to this stimulus. In accordance with these findings, rats were shown to discriminate between nicotine and quinine presented at intensity-paired concentrations. Moreover, rat gustatory cortex (GC) neural ensemble activity could also discriminate between these two bitter tastants. Mecamylamine reduced both behavioral and GC neural discrimination between nicotine and quinine. In summary, nicotine elicits taste responses through peripheral TRPM5-dependent pathways, common to other bitter tastants, and nAChR-dependent and TRPM5-independent pathways, thus creating a unique sensory representation that contributes to the sensory experience of tobacco products.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 64 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 26%
Professor 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 18%
Neuroscience 6 9%
Psychology 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,721,777
of 12,364,927 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#25,371
of 77,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,669,593
of 11,766,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#25,306
of 76,974 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,364,927 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,321 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,766,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76,974 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.