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The student resilience survey: psychometric validation and associations with mental health

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 474)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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30 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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113 Mendeley
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Title
The student resilience survey: psychometric validation and associations with mental health
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13034-016-0132-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suzet Tanya Lereya, Neil Humphrey, Praveetha Patalay, Miranda Wolpert, Jan R. Böhnke, Amy Macdougall, Jessica Deighton

Abstract

Policies, designed to promote resilience, and research, to understand the determinants and correlates of resilience, require reliable and valid measures to ensure data quality. The student resilience survey (SRS) covers a range of external supports and internal characteristics which can potentially be viewed as protective factors and can be crucial in exploring the mechanisms between protective factors and risk factors, and to design intervention and prevention strategies. This study examines the validity of the SRS. 7663 children (aged 11-15 years) from 12 local areas across England completed the SRS, and questionnaires regarding mental and physical health. Psychometric properties of 10 subscales of the SRS (family connection, school connection, community connection, participation in home and school life, participation in community life, peer support, self-esteem, empathy, problem solving, and goals and aspirations) were investigated by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), differential item functioning (DIF), differential test functioning (DTF), Cronbach's α and McDonald's ω. The associations between the SRS scales, mental and physical health outcomes were examined. The results supported the construct validity of the 10 factors of the scale and provided evidence for acceptable reliability of all the subscales. Our DIF analysis indicated differences between boys and girls, between primary and secondary school children, between children with or without special educational needs (SEN) and between children with or without English as an additional language (EAL) in terms of how they answered the peer support subscale of the SRS. Analyses did not indicate any DIF based on free school meals (FSM) eligibility. All subscales, except the peer support subscale, showed small DTF whereas the peer support subscale showed moderate DTF. Correlations showed that all the student resilience subscales were negatively associated with mental health difficulties, global subjective distress and impact on health. Random effects linear regression models showed that family connection, self-esteem, problem solving and peer support were negatively associated with all the mental health outcomes. The findings suggest that the SRS is a valid measure assessing these relevant protective factors, thereby serving as a valuable tool in resilience and mental health research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 113 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 113 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 18%
Researcher 17 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 11%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 12 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 45 40%
Social Sciences 22 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 19 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2020.
All research outputs
#957,508
of 15,418,159 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#28
of 474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,867
of 293,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#2
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,418,159 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 474 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.