↓ Skip to main content

The Ebola Crisis and the Corresponding Public Behavior: A System Dynamics Approach

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Currents, November 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 343)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The Ebola Crisis and the Corresponding Public Behavior: A System Dynamics Approach
Published in
PLoS Currents, November 2016
DOI 10.1371/currents.outbreaks.23badd9821870a002fa86bef6893c01d
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nasser Sharareh, Nasim S. Sabounchi, Hiroki Sayama, Roderick MacDonald

Abstract

The interaction of several sociocultural and environmental factors during an epidemic crisis leads to behavioral responses that consequently make the crisis control a complex problem. The system dynamics approach has been adopted to study the relationships between spread of disease, public attention, situational awareness, and community's response to the Ebola epidemic. In developing different simulation models to capture the trend of death and incidence data from the World Health Organization for the Ebola outbreak, the final model has the best fit to the historical trends. Results demonstrate that the increase of quarantining rate over time due to increase in situational awareness and performing safe burials had a significant impact on the control of epidemic. However, public attention did not play a significant role. The best fit to historical data are achieved when behavioral factors specific to West Africa like studying the Situational Awareness and Public Attention are included in the model. However, by ignoring the sociocultural factors, the model is not able to represent the reality; therefore, in the case of any epidemics, it is necessary that all the parties and community members find the most significant behavioral factors that can curb the epidemic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 17%
Other 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 3%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 9 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Mathematics 2 7%
Unspecified 2 7%
Engineering 2 7%
Other 7 24%
Unknown 9 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2017.
All research outputs
#822,514
of 11,874,697 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Currents
#47
of 343 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,169
of 256,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Currents
#5
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,874,697 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 343 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.