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The Inverse Relationship between the Microstructural Variability of Amygdala-Prefrontal Pathways and Trait Anxiety Is Moderated by Sex

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Redditor

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
The Inverse Relationship between the Microstructural Variability of Amygdala-Prefrontal Pathways and Trait Anxiety Is Moderated by Sex
Published in
Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, November 2016
DOI 10.3389/fnsys.2016.00093
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Justin Kim, Annemarie C. Brown, Alison M. Mattek, Samantha J. Chavez, James M. Taylor, Amy L. Palmer, Yu-Chien Wu, Paul J. Whalen

Abstract

Anxiety impacts the quality of everyday life and may facilitate the development of affective disorders, possibly through concurrent alterations in neural circuitry. Findings from multimodal neuroimaging studies suggest that trait-anxious individuals may have a reduced capacity for efficient communication between the amygdala and the ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC). A diffusion-weighted imaging protocol with 61 directions was used to identify lateral and medial amygdala-vPFC white matter pathways. The structural integrity of both pathways was inversely correlated with self-reported levels of trait anxiety. When this mask from our first dataset was then applied to an independent validation dataset, both pathways again showed a consistent inverse relationship with trait anxiety. Importantly, a moderating effect of sex was found, demonstrating that the observed brain-anxiety relationship was stronger in females. These data reveal a potential neuroanatomical mediator of previously documented functional alterations in amygdala-prefrontal connectivity that is associated with trait anxiety, which might prove informative for future studies of psychopathology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 41%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 19%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 44%
Neuroscience 5 19%
Unspecified 3 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Other 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2016.
All research outputs
#5,757,606
of 11,341,899 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
#384
of 992 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,030
of 253,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
#19
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,341,899 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 992 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,091 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.