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Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Science, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 55,219)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
216 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
837 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
29 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
12 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
161 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
470 Mendeley
citeulike
12 CiteULike
Title
Mutational signatures associated with tobacco smoking in human cancer
Published in
Science, November 2016
DOI 10.1126/science.aag0299
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. B. Alexandrov, Y. S. Ju, K. Haase, P. Van Loo, I. Martincorena, S. Nik-Zainal, Y. Totoki, A. Fujimoto, H. Nakagawa, T. Shibata, P. J. Campbell, P. Vineis, D. H. Phillips, M. R. Stratton

Abstract

Tobacco smoking increases the risk of at least 17 classes of human cancer. We analyzed somatic mutations and DNA methylation in 5243 cancers of types for which tobacco smoking confers an elevated risk. Smoking is associated with increased mutation burdens of multiple distinct mutational signatures, which contribute to different extents in different cancers. One of these signatures, mainly found in cancers derived from tissues directly exposed to tobacco smoke, is attributable to misreplication of DNA damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Others likely reflect indirect activation of DNA editing by APOBEC cytidine deaminases and of an endogenous clocklike mutational process. Smoking is associated with limited differences in methylation. The results are consistent with the proposition that smoking increases cancer risk by increasing the somatic mutation load, although direct evidence for this mechanism is lacking in some smoking-related cancer types.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 837 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 470 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 2%
United Kingdom 5 1%
France 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 5 1%
Unknown 440 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 126 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 104 22%
Student > Bachelor 50 11%
Student > Master 44 9%
Other 31 7%
Other 115 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 130 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 130 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 67 14%
Unspecified 39 8%
Computer Science 21 4%
Other 83 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2392. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2018.
All research outputs
#372
of 12,295,315 outputs
Outputs from Science
#28
of 55,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17
of 264,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#1
of 1,036 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,295,315 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55,219 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,551 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,036 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.