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Damaged Self-Esteem is Associated with Internalizing Problems

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

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Title
Damaged Self-Esteem is Associated with Internalizing Problems
Published in
Frontiers in Psychology, January 2013
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00152
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daan H. M. Creemers, Ron H. J. Scholte, Rutger C. M. E. Engels, Mitchell J. Prinstein, Reinout W. Wiers, Creemers, Daan, Scholte, Ron, Engels, Rutger, Prinstein, Mitchell, Wiers, Reinout W

Abstract

Implicit and explicit self-esteem are assumed to be important factors in understanding the onset and maintenance of psychological problems. The current study aims to examine the association between implicit and explicit self-esteem and their interaction with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness. Specifically, the relationship between the size and the direction of the discrepancy between implicit and explicit self-esteem with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness were examined. Participants were 95 young female adults (M = 21.2 years, SD = 1.88) enrolled in higher education. We administered the IAT to assess implicit self-esteem, and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale to measure explicit self-esteem while psychological problems were assessed through self-reports. Results showed that discrepancies between implicit and explicit self-esteem were positively associated with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness. In addition, the direction of the discrepancy was specifically relevant: damaged self-esteem (i.e., high implicit self-esteem and low explicit self-esteem) was consistently associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness. In contrast, defensive or fragile self-esteem (i.e., low implicit and high explicit self-esteem) was solely associated with loneliness. These findings provide further support that specifically damaged self-esteem is an important vulnerability marker for depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and loneliness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 5%
Malaysia 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 39 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 35%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Professor 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 56%
Unspecified 6 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Engineering 2 5%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 March 2014.
All research outputs
#6,023,442
of 11,410,345 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychology
#5,007
of 9,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,711
of 130,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychology
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,410,345 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,943 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 130,514 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.