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Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical and Projected Nuclear Power

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 10,318)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
23 news outlets
blogs
19 blogs
twitter
688 tweeters
facebook
23 Facebook pages
wikipedia
7 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
33 Google+ users
reddit
6 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
198 Mendeley
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Title
Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical and Projected Nuclear Power
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, March 2013
DOI 10.1021/es3051197
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pushker A. Kharecha, James E Hansen, Kharecha PA, Hansen JE, James E. Hansen

Abstract

In the aftermath of the March 2011 accident at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the future contribution of nuclear power to the global energy supply has become somewhat uncertain. Because nuclear power is an abundant, low-carbon source of base-load power, it could make a large contribution to mitigation of global climate change and air pollution. Using historical production data, we calculate that global nuclear power has prevented an average of 1.84 million air pollution-related deaths and 64 gigatonnes of CO2-equivalent (GtCO2-eq) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that would have resulted from fossil fuel burning. On the basis of global projection data that take into account the effects of the Fukushima accident, we find that nuclear power could additionally prevent an average of 420,000-7.04 million deaths and 80-240 GtCO2-eq emissions due to fossil fuels by midcentury, depending on which fuel it replaces. By contrast, we assess that large-scale expansion of unconstrained natural gas use would not mitigate the climate problem and would cause far more deaths than expansion of nuclear power.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 688 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 198 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 4%
Germany 3 2%
United Kingdom 3 2%
Australia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 173 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 47 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 21%
Student > Bachelor 36 18%
Researcher 31 16%
Other 11 6%
Other 32 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 44 22%
Environmental Science 28 14%
Unspecified 19 10%
Chemistry 16 8%
Social Sciences 16 8%
Other 75 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 926. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2018.
All research outputs
#2,897
of 9,710,353 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#4
of 10,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33
of 126,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#1
of 234 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,710,353 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,318 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,543 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 234 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.