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Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Avian Resistance to Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Identifies Risk Locus Spanning the CDH13 Gene

Overview of attention for article published in G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, May 2013
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1 tweeter

Citations

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Avian Resistance to Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Identifies Risk Locus Spanning the CDH13 Gene
Published in
G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, May 2013
DOI 10.1534/g3.113.006031
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Connell, Kieran G Meade, Brenda Allan, Andrew T Lloyd, Tim Downing, Cliona O’Farrelly, Daniel G Bradley

Abstract

The enteropathogen Campylobacter jejuni is a major worldwide health and economic burden, being one of the leading causes of bacterial gastroenteritis and commonly linked to postinfectious onset of autoimmune disease. Chickens are a major vector for human infection and even though variation in avian colonization level is heritable, no previous studies have identified regions of the genome associated with colonization resistance. We performed a genome-wide association study of resistance to C. jejuni colonization in the avian intestine by controlling for population structure, which revealed a risk locus with genome-wide significance spanning the T-cadherin (CDH13) gene. A second possible risk locus was also identified close to calmodulin (CALM1), a calcium-activated modulator of cadherin function. In addition, gene expression analysis of mRNA sequencing profiles revealed that the relative expression of the two genes is significantly associated with colonization resistance. Functional studies have previously demonstrated involvement of cadherins and calmodulin in C. jejuni intracellular invasion and colonization of human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Consistent with this finding, our analysis reveals that variation surrounding these genes is associated with avian colonization resistance in vivo and highlights their potential as possible targets for control of the bacterium in avian and human populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
South Africa 1 3%
Unknown 32 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 10 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 10 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2013.
All research outputs
#3,077,621
of 4,507,211 outputs
Outputs from G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
#415
of 608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,106
of 89,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age from G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
#12
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 608 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,207 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.