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Hemoglobin levels and blood transfusion in patients with sepsis in Internal Medicine Departments

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2016
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Title
Hemoglobin levels and blood transfusion in patients with sepsis in Internal Medicine Departments
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1882-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gassan Fuad Muady, Haim Bitterman, Arie Laor, Moshe Vardi, Vitally Urin, Nesrin Ghanem-Zoubi

Abstract

Acute reduction in hemoglobin levels is frequently seen during sepsis. Previous studies have focused on the management of anemia in patients with septic shock admitted to intensive care units (ICU's), including aggressive blood transfusion aiming to enhance tissue oxygenation. To study the changes in hemoglobin concentrations during the first week of sepsis in the setting of Internal Medicine (IM) units, and their correlation to survival. Observational prospective study. We recorded hemoglobin values upon admission and throughout the first week of hospital stay in a consecutive cohort of septic patients admitted to IM units at a community hospital, the patients were enrolled into a prospective registry. Data on blood transfusions was also collected, we examined the correlation between hemoglobin concentrations during the first week of sepsis and survival, the effect of blood transfusion was also assessed. Eight hundred and fifteen patients (815) with sepsis were enrolled between February 2008 to January 2009. More than 20 % of them had hemoglobin levels less than 10g/dL on admission, a rate that was doubled during the first week of sepsis. Overall, 68 (8.3 %) received blood transfusions, 14 of them (20.6 %) due to bleeding. Typically, blood transfusion was given to older patients with a higher rate of malignancy and lower hemoglobin levels. While hemoglobin concentration on admission had strong correlation with in-hospital mortality (O.R-0.83 [95 % C.I. 0.74-0.92], blood transfusion was not found to be an independent predicting factor for mortality. Anemia is very common in sepsis. While hemoglobin level on admission exhibit independent correlation with survival, blood transfusion do not.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Other 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Student > Master 3 7%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 26%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2016.
All research outputs
#7,452,346
of 8,606,703 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,430
of 3,814 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,119
of 246,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#159
of 230 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 230 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.