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Use of molecular typing to investigate bacterial translocation from the intestinal tract of chlorpyrifos-exposed rats

Overview of attention for article published in Gut Pathogens, November 2016
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Title
Use of molecular typing to investigate bacterial translocation from the intestinal tract of chlorpyrifos-exposed rats
Published in
Gut Pathogens, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13099-016-0129-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire Joly Condette, Bertin Elion Dzon, Farida Hamdad, Maurice Biendo, Véronique Bach, Hafida Khorsi-Cauet

Abstract

Human are confronted on a daily basis with contaminant pesticide residues in food, water and other components of the environment. Although the digestive system is the first organ to come into contact with food contaminants, very few data are available on the impact of low-dose pesticide exposure during the in utero and postnatal periods on intestinal bacterial translocation (BT). Previous studies have revealed that chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and the contamination of sterile organs. Here, molecular typing was used to investigate intestinal bacterial translocation in rats exposed to chlorpyrifos in utero and during lactation. The translocated bacteria were profiled, and CPF tolerance and antibiotic resistance traits were determined. A total of 72 intestinal segments and extra-intestinal organs were obtained from 14 CPF-exposed rats. The samples were cultured to isolate bacterial strains that had tolerated treatment with 1 or 5 mg CPF/kg bodyweight/day in vivo. Strains were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Biotyper. The disk diffusion method was used to determine the antibiotic susceptibility. The isolates were genotyped with PCR assays for the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence and random amplification polymorphic DNA. Bacterial translocation was confirmed for 7 of the 31 strains (22.6 %) isolated from extra-intestinal sites. Overall, the most prevalent bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (55.5 % of the 72 intestinal and extra-intestinal isolates), Enterococcus faecalis (27.7 %) and Bacillus cereus (9.8 %). 5 % of the S. aureus isolates displayed methicillin resistance. Seventy two strains were identified phenotypically, and seven translocated strains (mainly S. aureus) were identified by genotyping. Genotypically confirmed translocation was mainly observed found in pesticide-exposed groups (6 out of 7). BT from the intestinal tract colonized normally sterile extra-intestinal organs in CPF-exposed rats. Our findings validate the use of molecular typing for the assessment of intestinal BT in CPF-exposed rats during critical periods of development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Professor 1 8%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Neuroscience 2 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Unknown 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2018.
All research outputs
#8,574,093
of 13,644,952 outputs
Outputs from Gut Pathogens
#182
of 323 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,054
of 287,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut Pathogens
#35
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,952 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 323 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,425 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.