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A pilot study of health and wellness coaching for fibromyalgia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
A pilot study of health and wellness coaching for fibromyalgia
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1316-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin V. Hackshaw, Marcal Plans-Pujolras, Luis E. Rodriguez-Saona, Margaret A. Moore, Erika K. Jackson, Gary A. Sforzo, C. A. Tony Buffington

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a health and wellness coaching (HWC)-based intervention for fibromyalgia (FM) would result in sustained improvements in health and quality of life, and reductions in health care utilization. Nine female subjects meeting American College of Rheumatology criteria for a diagnosis of primary FM were studied. The HWC protocol had two components, which were delivered telephonically over a twelve-month period. First, each patient met individually with a coach during the 12 month study at the patient's preference of schedule and frequency (Range:22-32 × 45-min sessions). Coaches were health professionals trained in health and wellness coaching tasks, knowledge, and skills. Second, each patient participated in bimonthly (first six months) and monthly (second six months) group classes on self-coaching strategies during the 12 month study. Prior to the intervention, and after 6 months and 12 months of coaching, the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) was used to measure health and quality of life, and the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI) was used to measure pain intensity and interference with function. Total and rheumatology-related health encounters were documented using electronic medical records. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. All nine patients finished the HWC protocol. FIQR scores improved by 35 % (P = 0.001). BPI scores decreased by 32 % overall (P = 0.006), 31 % for severity (P = 0.02), and 44 % for interference (P = 0.006). Health care utilization declined by 86 % (P = 0.006) for total and 78 % (P < 0.0001) for rheumatology-related encounters. The HWC program added to standard FM therapy produced clinically significant improvements in quality of life measures (FIQR), pain (BPI), and marked reductions in health care utilization. Such improvements do not typically occur spontaneously in FM patients, suggesting that HWC deserves further consideration as an intervention for FM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 65 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 27%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 19 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 20%
Psychology 6 9%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Sports and Recreations 3 5%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 14 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2019.
All research outputs
#506,776
of 14,504,773 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#79
of 2,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,927
of 289,580 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#7
of 298 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,504,773 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,877 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,580 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 298 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.