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Measurement properties of the upright motor control test for adults with stroke: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Physiotherapy, November 2016
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Title
Measurement properties of the upright motor control test for adults with stroke: a systematic review
Published in
Archives of Physiotherapy, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40945-016-0027-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward James R. Gorgon, Rolando T. Lazaro

Abstract

The Upright Motor Control Test (UMCT) has been used in clinical practice and research to assess functional strength of the hemiparetic lower limb in adults with stroke. It is unclear if evidence is sufficient to warrant its use. The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize available evidence on the measurement properties of the UMCT for stroke rehabilitation. Electronic databases that indexed biomedical literature were systematically searched from inception until October 2015 (week 4): Embase, PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, PEDro, Cochrane Library, Scopus, ScienceDirect, SPORTDiscus, LILACS, DOAJ, and Google Scholar. All studies that had used the UMCT in the time period covered underwent hand searching for any additional study. Observational studies involving adults with stroke that explored any measurement property of the UMCT were included. The COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments was used to assess the methodological quality of included studies. The CanChild Outcome Measures Rating Form was used for extracting data on measurement properties and clinical utility. The search yielded three methodologic studies that addressed criterion-related validity and contruct validity. Two studies of fair methodological quality demonstrated moderate-level evidence that Knee Extension and Knee Flexion subtest scores were predictive of community-level and household-level ambulation. One study of fair methodological quality provided limited-level evidence for the correlation of Knee Extension subtest scores with a laboratory measure of ground reaction forces. No published studies formally assessed reliability, responsiveness, or clinical utility. Limited information on responsiveness and clinical utility dimensions could be inferred from the included studies. The UMCT is a practical assessment tool for voluntary control or functional strength of the hemiparetic lower limb in standing in adults with stroke. Although different levels of evidence suggest that the Knee Extension and Knee Flexion subtests may possess criterion and construct validity, the lack of published literature examining content validity, reliability, and responsiveness raises questions regarding the use of the UMCT in routine clinical practice. These key findings highlight the need to further investigate the UMCT's measurement properties toward enhancing its standardization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 30%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 4%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 12 52%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 22%
Computer Science 2 9%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2016.
All research outputs
#11,400,351
of 14,377,025 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Physiotherapy
#62
of 65 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,521
of 289,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Physiotherapy
#10
of 10 outputs
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