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RNA Maps Reveal New RNA Classes and a Possible Function for Pervasive Transcription

Overview of attention for article published in Science, June 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
9 tweeters
patent
20 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
1722 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1092 Mendeley
citeulike
26 CiteULike
connotea
21 Connotea
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Title
RNA Maps Reveal New RNA Classes and a Possible Function for Pervasive Transcription
Published in
Science, June 2007
DOI 10.1126/science.1138341
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. Kapranov, J. Cheng, S. Dike, D. A. Nix, R. Duttagupta, A. T. Willingham, P. F. Stadler, J. Hertel, J. Hackermuller, I. L. Hofacker, I. Bell, E. Cheung, J. Drenkow, E. Dumais, S. Patel, G. Helt, M. Ganesh, S. Ghosh, A. Piccolboni, V. Sementchenko, H. Tammana, T. R. Gingeras

Abstract

Significant fractions of eukaryotic genomes give rise to RNA, much of which is unannotated and has reduced protein-coding potential. The genomic origins and the associations of human nuclear and cytosolic polyadenylated RNAs longer than 200 nucleotides (nt) and whole-cell RNAs less than 200 nt were investigated in this genome-wide study. Subcellular addresses for nucleotides present in detected RNAs were assigned, and their potential processing into short RNAs was investigated. Taken together, these observations suggest a novel role for some unannotated RNAs as primary transcripts for the production of short RNAs. Three potentially functional classes of RNAs have been identified, two of which are syntenically conserved and correlate with the expression state of protein-coding genes. These data support a highly interleaved organization of the human transcriptome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,092 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 22 2%
United Kingdom 10 <1%
Brazil 7 <1%
Germany 5 <1%
Belgium 4 <1%
Japan 4 <1%
Denmark 3 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Other 21 2%
Unknown 1012 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 275 25%
Researcher 245 22%
Student > Master 157 14%
Student > Bachelor 84 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 74 7%
Other 165 15%
Unknown 92 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 546 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 284 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 48 4%
Computer Science 21 2%
Neuroscience 20 2%
Other 60 5%
Unknown 113 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2019.
All research outputs
#710,214
of 16,021,503 outputs
Outputs from Science
#15,996
of 68,241 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#679,452
of 15,005,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#15,989
of 68,137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,021,503 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68,241 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 15,005,851 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68,137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.