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Retinoblastoma

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, August 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
101 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
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Title
Retinoblastoma
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, August 2006
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-1-31
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabelle Aerts, Livia Lumbroso-Le Rouic, Marion Gauthier-Villars, Hervé Brisse, François Doz, Laurence Desjardins

Abstract

Retinoblastoma is a rare eye tumor of childhood that arises in the retina. It is the most common intraocular malignancy of infancy and childhood; with an incidence of 1/15,000-20,000 live births. The two most frequent symptoms revealing retinoblastoma are leukocoria and strabismus. Iris rubeosis, hypopyon, hyphema, buphthalmia, orbital cellulites and exophthalmia may also be observed. Sixty per cent of retinoblastomas are unilateral and most of these forms are not hereditary (median age at diagnosis two years). Retinoblastoma is bilateral in 40% of cases (median age at diagnosis one year). All bilateral and multifocal unilateral forms are hereditary. Hereditary retinoblastoma constitutes a cancer predisposition syndrome: a subject constitutionally carrying an RB1 gene mutation has a greater than 90% risk of developing retinoblastoma but is also at increased risk of developing other types of cancers. Diagnosis is made by fundoscopy. Ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans may contribute to diagnosis. Management of patients with retinoblastoma must take into account the various aspects of the disease: the visual risk, the possibly hereditary nature of the disease, the life-threatening risk. Enucleation is still often necessary in unilateral disease; the decision for adjuvant treatment is taken according to the histological risk factors. Conservative treatment for at least one eye is possible in most of the bilateral cases. It includes laser alone or combined with chemotherapy, cryotherapy and brachytherapy. The indication for external beam radiotherapy should be restricted to large ocular tumors and diffuse vitreous seeding because of the risk of late effects, including secondary sarcoma. Vital prognosis, related to retinoblastoma alone, is now excellent in patients with unilateral or bilateral forms of retinoblastoma. Long term follow-up and early counseling regarding the risk of second primary tumors and transmission should be offered to retinoblastoma patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
India 1 <1%
Pakistan 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 124 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 24%
Student > Master 23 17%
Student > Postgraduate 20 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 12%
Researcher 11 8%
Other 25 19%
Unknown 7 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 67 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 14%
Chemistry 3 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 2%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 11 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,955,411
of 14,737,820 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#508
of 1,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,247
of 150,976 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#9
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,737,820 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,609 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,976 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.