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Effect of mirtazapine versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on benzodiazepine use in patients with major depressive disorder: a pragmatic, multicenter, open-label, randomized, active-controlle…

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of General Psychiatry, October 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of mirtazapine versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on benzodiazepine use in patients with major depressive disorder: a pragmatic, multicenter, open-label, randomized, active-controlled, 24-week trial
Published in
Annals of General Psychiatry, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12991-016-0115-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tasuku Hashimoto, Akihiro Shiina, Tadashi Hasegawa, Hiroshi Kimura, Yasunori Oda, Tomihisa Niitsu, Masatomo Ishikawa, Masumi Tachibana, Katsumasa Muneoka, Satoshi Matsuki, Michiko Nakazato, Masaomi Iyo

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate whether selecting mirtazapine as the first choice for current depressive episode instead of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) reduces benzodiazepine use in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We concurrently examined the relationship between clinical responses and serum mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its precursor, proBDNF. We conducted an open-label randomized trial in routine psychiatric practice settings. Seventy-seven MDD outpatients were randomly assigned to the mirtazapine or predetermined SSRIs groups, and investigators arbitrarily selected sertraline or paroxetine. The primary outcome was the proportion of benzodiazepine users at weeks 6, 12, and 24 between the groups. We defined patients showing a ≥50 % reduction in Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) scores from baseline as responders. Blood samples were collected at baseline, weeks 6, 12, and 24. Sixty-five patients prescribed benzodiazepines from prescription day 1 were analyzed for the primary outcome. The percentage of benzodiazepine users was significantly lower in the mirtazapine than in the SSRIs group at weeks 6, 12, and 24 (21.4 vs. 81.8 %; 11.1 vs. 85.7 %, both P < 0.001; and 12.5 vs. 81.8 %, P = 0.0011, respectively). No between-group difference was observed in HDRS score changes. Serum proBDNF levels were significantly decreased (χ(2) = 8.5, df = 3, P = 0.036) and serum mature BDNF levels were temporarily significantly decreased (F = 3.5, df = 2.4, P = 0.027) in the responders of both groups at week 24. This study demonstrated mirtazapine as the first-choice antidepressant for current depressive episodes may reduce benzodiazepine use in patients with MDD. Trial registration UMIN000004144. Registered 2nd September 2010. The date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial was 24th August 2010. This study was retrospectively registered 9 days after the first participant was enrolled.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 20%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Master 6 12%
Other 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 41%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 10%
Neuroscience 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 10 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2018.
All research outputs
#4,290,008
of 15,818,351 outputs
Outputs from Annals of General Psychiatry
#110
of 387 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,942
of 293,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of General Psychiatry
#7
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,818,351 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 387 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,773 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.