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ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC

Overview of attention for article published in Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 409)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
ADHERENCE TO INFLUENZA VACCINATION AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS DURING AND AFTER INFLUENZA A (H1N1) PANDEMIC
Published in
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, January 2016
DOI 10.1590/s1678-9946201658082
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stéfano Ivani de PAULA, Gustavo Ivani de PAULA, Kelly Simone Almeida CUNEGUNDES, Maria Isabel de MORAES-PINTO

Abstract

This study evaluated the adherence to influenza vaccination among medical students in 2010 and 2011. From August to December 2011, a questionnaire was used to record the influenza vaccination in 2010 and 2011, reasons for acceptance of the influenza vaccine and knowledge of healthcare workers about the influenza vaccine recommendation. One hundred and forty-four students from the 2ndto the 6th years of the medical school were interviewed. A great adherence to pandemic influenza vaccine was noted in 2010, (91% of the students), with "self-protection" being the most common reason cited for vaccination. Other determinants for the vaccination during pandemic were "convenient access to vaccine" and "encouragement by peers and teachers in workplaces and at the university". However, there was a great decay in the acceptance to vaccine in the next influenza season (2011). Only 42% of the students received the vaccine. They claimed "lack of time" and "have forgotten to take the vaccine" as the main reasons. The "knowledge on the recommendation of influenza vaccine to healthcare workers" increased when the students come to attend the last year of the medical school, but that was an insufficient motivator for vaccination. Strategies to increase vaccination should be based on the abovementioned aspects for the adoption of effective measures in both, pandemic and seasonal periods.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Bachelor 10 20%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 14 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 18 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#5,417,778
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#47
of 409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,973
of 298,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 409 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,200 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them