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Predictors of fatigue in cancer patients before and after chemotherapy

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health Psychology, March 2013
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Predictors of fatigue in cancer patients before and after chemotherapy
Published in
Journal of Health Psychology, March 2013
DOI 10.1177/1359105313477675
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria M Pertl, David Hevey, Sonya Collier, Kathryn Lambe, Anne-Marie O’Dwyer

Abstract

Fatigue is a debilitating and common condition in cancer patients. This study examined pretreatment predictors of fatigue before chemotherapy and also assessed whether these could prospectively predict fatigue posttreatment. A total of 100 patients completed questionnaires assessing psychological factors, physical activity and sleep. A subsample of 26 participants wore actigraphs to objectively assess sleep/wake and activity/rest. Fatigue was measured pretreatment and posttreatment and at follow-up several months later. Greater pretreatment pain, depression, stress and sleep disruption significantly predicted greater fatigue before chemotherapy, explaining 55 percent of the variance. Pretreatment fatigue significantly predicted post-treatment fatigue. No other significant prospective predictors of posttreatment fatigue emerged.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 6%
Ireland 1 3%
Unknown 33 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 33%
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2013.
All research outputs
#7,840,020
of 12,494,470 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health Psychology
#968
of 1,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,607
of 144,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health Psychology
#22
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,494,470 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,626 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 144,248 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.