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Learning cooking skills at different ages: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
49 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
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Title
Learning cooking skills at different ages: a cross-sectional study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0446-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiona Lavelle, Michelle Spence, Lynsey Hollywood, Laura McGowan, Dawn Surgenor, Amanda McCloat, Elaine Mooney, Martin Caraher, Monique Raats, Moira Dean

Abstract

Cooking skills are increasingly included in strategies to prevent and reduce chronic diet-related diseases and obesity. While cooking interventions target all age groups (Child, Teen and Adult), the optimal age for learning these skills on: 1) skills retention, 2) cooking practices, 3) cooking attitudes, 4) diet quality and 5) health is unknown. Similarly, although the source of learning cooking skills has been previously studied, the differences in learning from these different sources has not been considered. This research investigated the associations of the age and source of learning with the aforementioned five factors. A nationally representative (Northern/Republic of Ireland) cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 1049 adults aged between 20-60 years. The survey included both measures developed and tested by the researchers as well as validated measures of cooking (e.g. chopping) and food skills (e.g. budgeting), cooking practices (e.g. food safety), cooking attitudes, diet quality and health. Respondents also stated when they learnt the majority of their skills and their sources of learning. The data was analysed using ANOVAs with post-hoc analysis and Chi(2) crosstabs with a significance level of 0.05. Results showed that child (<12 years) and/or teen (13-18 years) learners had significantly greater numbers of, and confidence in, their cooking and food skills, cooking practices, cooking attitudes, diet quality (with the exception of fibre intake where adult learners were higher) and health. Mother was the primary source of learning and those who learnt only from this source had significantly better outcomes on 12 of the 23 measures. This research highlights the importance of learning cooking skills at an early age for skill retention, confidence, cooking practices, cooking attitude and diet quality. Mother remained the primary source of learning, however, as there is a reported deskilling of domestic cooks, mothers may no longer have the ability to teach cooking skills to the next generation. A focus on alternative sources including practical cooking skills education starting at an early age is required. This study also highlights the need for further longitudinal research on the impact of age and source of learning on cooking skills.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 164 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 39 24%
Student > Bachelor 26 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 15%
Researcher 14 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 5%
Other 29 18%
Unknown 23 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 32 20%
Social Sciences 28 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 10%
Psychology 11 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 6%
Other 29 18%
Unknown 37 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 80. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2020.
All research outputs
#241,353
of 14,601,379 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#74
of 1,483 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,276
of 285,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#9
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,601,379 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,483 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.