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The Trier Social Stress Test: Principles and practice

Overview of attention for article published in Neurobiology of Stress, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 362)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
204 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
692 Mendeley
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Title
The Trier Social Stress Test: Principles and practice
Published in
Neurobiology of Stress, February 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.ynstr.2016.11.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew P. Allen, Paul J. Kennedy, Samantha Dockray, John F. Cryan, Timothy G. Dinan, Gerard Clarke

Abstract

Researchers interested in the neurobiology of the acute stress response in humans require a valid and reliable acute stressor that can be used under experimental conditions. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) provides such a testing platform. It induces stress by requiring participants to make an interview-style presentation, followed by a surprise mental arithmetic test, in front of an interview panel who do not provide feedback or encouragement. In this review, we outline the methodology of the TSST, and discuss key findings under conditions of health and stress-related disorder. The TSST has unveiled differences in males and females, as well as different age groups, in their neurobiological response to acute stress. The TSST has also deepened our understanding of how genotype may moderate the cognitive neurobiology of acute stress, and exciting new inroads have been made in understanding epigenetic contributions to the biological regulation of the acute stress response using the TSST. A number of innovative adaptations have been developed which allow for the TSST to be used in group settings, with children, in combination with brain imaging, and with virtual committees. Future applications may incorporate the emerging links between the gut microbiome and the stress response. Future research should also maximise use of behavioural data generated by the TSST. Alternative acute stress paradigms may have utility over the TSST in certain situations, such as those that require repeat testing. Nonetheless, we expect that the TSST remains the gold standard for examining the cognitive neurobiology of acute stress in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 692 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 692 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 118 17%
Student > Bachelor 113 16%
Student > Master 93 13%
Researcher 74 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 55 8%
Other 87 13%
Unknown 152 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 218 32%
Neuroscience 60 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 53 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 4%
Engineering 26 4%
Other 117 17%
Unknown 191 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 117. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2022.
All research outputs
#276,391
of 21,788,432 outputs
Outputs from Neurobiology of Stress
#11
of 362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,667
of 313,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurobiology of Stress
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,788,432 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.