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Opening communication channels with people living with HIV using mobile phone text messaging: insights from the CAMPS trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, April 2013
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Opening communication channels with people living with HIV using mobile phone text messaging: insights from the CAMPS trial
Published in
BMC Research Notes, April 2013
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-6-131
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lawrence Mbuagbaw, Lehana Thabane, Pierre Ongolo-Zogo

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Using two-way mobile phone text messages to improve adherence to antiretroviral medication enhances communication between patients and health workers. We describe the implications of participants' responses to text messages in the Cameroon Mobile Phone SMS (CAMPS) trial. FINDINGS: This is a cross-sectional analysis of data from the intervention arm of the CAMPS trial. CAMPS was a randomized controlled trial of motivational text messaging versus usual care to improve adherence to antiretroviral medication among people living with HIV in Yaounde, Cameroon (n = 200) over a 6 month period. Participants in the intervention arm (n = 101) were given a contact phone number, but were not required to respond to their reminder messages. If they did, their responses were noted and reported as counts and percentages. We received 99 phone calls and 55 text messages (154 responses) from 48 participants during the study period. The median number of responses was 1 (first quartile [Q1]: 1; third quartile [Q3]: 3). Half (n = 79, 51.1%) of them were expressions of gratitude. The rest included requests for logistical (n = 21, 13.6%), medical (n = 20, 12.9%) and financial (n = 11, 7.1%) support. CONCLUSION: Initiating two-way mobile communication opens more channels for people living with HIV to express unmet needs. Researchers, policy makers and clinicians should be ready to respond to the needs expressed by patients who respond to text messages.Trial registration: Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry: PACTR201011000261458Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01247181.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 68 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 19%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Lecturer 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 21%
Social Sciences 11 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 14%
Computer Science 5 7%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2013.
All research outputs
#2,931,823
of 4,507,211 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#833
of 1,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,146
of 89,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#44
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,369 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.