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Thinking, Fast and Slow? Some Field Experiments to Reduce Crime and Dropout in Chicago*

Overview of attention for article published in Quarterly Journal of Economics, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
8 policy sources
twitter
113 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
4 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
101 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
320 Mendeley
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Title
Thinking, Fast and Slow? Some Field Experiments to Reduce Crime and Dropout in Chicago*
Published in
Quarterly Journal of Economics, October 2016
DOI 10.1093/qje/qjw033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara B. Heller, Anuj K. Shah, Jonathan Guryan, Jens Ludwig, Sendhil Mullainathan, Harold A. Pollack

Abstract

We present the results of three large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) carried out in Chicago, testing interventions to reduce crime and dropout by changing the decision making of economically disadvantaged youth. We study a program called Becoming a Man (BAM), developed by the nonprofit Youth Guidance, in two RCTs implemented in 2009-2010 and 2013-2015. In the two studies participation in the program reduced total arrests during the intervention period by 28-35%, reduced violent-crime arrests by 45-50%, improved school engagement, and in the first study where we have follow-up data, increased graduation rates by 12-19%. The third RCT tested a program with partially overlapping components carried out in the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center (JTDC), which reduced readmission rates to the facility by 21%. These large behavioral responses combined with modest program costs imply benefit-cost ratios for these interventions from 5-to-1 up to 30-to-1 or more. Our data on mechanisms are not ideal, but we find no positive evidence that these effects are due to changes in emotional intelligence or social skills, self-control or "grit," or a generic mentoring effect. We find suggestive support for the hypothesis that the programs work by helping youth slow down and reflect on whether their automatic thoughts and behaviors are well suited to the situation they are in, or whether the situation could be construed differently.JELCodes: C91, C93, D03, D1, I24, I3, I32, K42.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 113 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 320 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
France 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 312 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 89 28%
Student > Master 56 18%
Researcher 33 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 9%
Student > Bachelor 26 8%
Other 44 14%
Unknown 44 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 99 31%
Social Sciences 79 25%
Psychology 39 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 2%
Other 28 9%
Unknown 57 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 244. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2021.
All research outputs
#92,269
of 19,191,377 outputs
Outputs from Quarterly Journal of Economics
#55
of 2,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,909
of 301,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Quarterly Journal of Economics
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,191,377 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,049 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.