↓ Skip to main content

The ?-amyloid protein of Alzheimer?s disease binds to membrane lipids but does not bind to the ?7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurochemistry, June 2007
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

f1000
1 research highlight platform

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The ?-amyloid protein of Alzheimer?s disease binds to membrane lipids but does not bind to the ?7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor
Published in
Journal of Neurochemistry, June 2007
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2006.04444.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

David H. Small, Danuta Maksel, Megan L. Kerr, Judy Ng, Xu Hou, Cindy Chu, Hossein Mehrani, Sharon Unabia, Michael F. Azari, Richard Loiacono, Marie-Isabel Aguilar, Mary Chebib

Abstract

Accumulation of the amyloid protein (Abeta) in the brain is an important step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanism by which Abeta exerts its neurotoxic effect is largely unknown. It has been suggested that the peptide can bind to the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR). In this study, we examined the binding of Abeta1-42 to endogenous and recombinantly expressed alpha7nAChRs. Abeta1-42 did neither inhibit the specific binding of alpha7nAChR ligands to rat brain homogenate or slice preparations, nor did it influence the activity of alpha7nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Similarly, Abeta1-42 did not compete for alpha-bungarotoxin-binding sites on SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing alpha7nAChRs. The effect of the Abeta1-42 on tau phosphorylation was also examined. Although Abeta1-42 altered tau phosphorylation in alpha7nAChR-transfected SH-SY5Y cells, the effect of the peptide was unrelated to alpha7nAChR expression or activity. Binding studies using surface plasmon resonance indicated that the majority of the Abeta bound to membrane lipid, rather than to a protein component. Fluorescence anisotropy experiments indicated that Abeta may disrupt membrane lipid structure or fluidity. We conclude that the effects of Abeta are unlikely to be mediated by direct binding to the alpha7nAChR. Instead, we speculate that Abeta may exert its effects by altering the packing of lipids within the plasma membrane, which could, in turn, influence the function of a variety of receptors and channels on the cell surface.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 7%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Unknown 55 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 31%
Researcher 16 26%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Professor 5 8%
Other 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 13%
Neuroscience 8 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Chemistry 5 8%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2007.
All research outputs
#7,719,590
of 12,349,572 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurochemistry
#4,910
of 5,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,420,775
of 11,746,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurochemistry
#4,857
of 5,718 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,349,572 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,819 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,746,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,718 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.